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"Put your Hands up in the Air"? The interpersonal effects of pride and shame expressions on opponents and teammates.

Furley P, Moll T, Memmert D - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Across a series of experiments using the point-light method, pride and shame expressions exerted strong effects upon observers' anticipated emotions, associated cognitions, and performance expectations.Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in two pilot studies we demonstrated that the created pride and shame point-light stimuli were implicitly associated with status and performance related attributes.In conclusion, the present research highlights the potential interpersonal influence of the nonverbal expressions of pride and shame in soccer penalty shootouts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive and Team/Racket Sport Research, German Sport University Cologne Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present research was to investigate the interpersonal effects of pride and shame expressions amongst opponents and teammates in a soccer penalty scenario. Across a series of experiments using the point-light method, pride and shame expressions exerted strong effects upon observers' anticipated emotions, associated cognitions, and performance expectations. Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in two pilot studies we demonstrated that the created pride and shame point-light stimuli were implicitly associated with status and performance related attributes. In Experiment 1, observing pride expressions caused opponents to anticipate more negative emotions, cognitions, and lower performance expectancies toward their next performance in comparison with neutral expressions. In contrast, pride expressions led teammates to anticipate more positive emotions (i.e., pride and happiness), cognitions, and performance expectations toward their next performance than neutral expressions (Experiments 2-4). The results are discussed within the emotions as social information (EASI, Van Kleef, 2009) framework by arguing that the social context has to be taken into account when investigating the interpersonal effects of emotion expressions. In conclusion, the present research highlights the potential interpersonal influence of the nonverbal expressions of pride and shame in soccer penalty shootouts.

No MeSH data available.


Hypothesized model based on Van Kleef (2009) on the display of emotional nonverbal expressions in a sports situation.
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Figure 1: Hypothesized model based on Van Kleef (2009) on the display of emotional nonverbal expressions in a sports situation.

Mentions: Figure 1 displays the combined guiding model for the present research exemplified in a soccer penalty shootout. Depending on the outcome of an important soccer penalty kick, a penalty taker will experience a certain emotion (e.g., pride after a successful attempt and shame after an unsuccessful attempt) which in many cases leads to the nonverbal expression of the respective emotion (Moll et al., 2010). According to evolutionary accounts, the pride and shame expressions signal certain social information which can be reliably recognized by both team-mates and opponents. The EASI model predicts that this influences observer's behavior via the described inferential and affective processes.


"Put your Hands up in the Air"? The interpersonal effects of pride and shame expressions on opponents and teammates.

Furley P, Moll T, Memmert D - Front Psychol (2015)

Hypothesized model based on Van Kleef (2009) on the display of emotional nonverbal expressions in a sports situation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562262&req=5

Figure 1: Hypothesized model based on Van Kleef (2009) on the display of emotional nonverbal expressions in a sports situation.
Mentions: Figure 1 displays the combined guiding model for the present research exemplified in a soccer penalty shootout. Depending on the outcome of an important soccer penalty kick, a penalty taker will experience a certain emotion (e.g., pride after a successful attempt and shame after an unsuccessful attempt) which in many cases leads to the nonverbal expression of the respective emotion (Moll et al., 2010). According to evolutionary accounts, the pride and shame expressions signal certain social information which can be reliably recognized by both team-mates and opponents. The EASI model predicts that this influences observer's behavior via the described inferential and affective processes.

Bottom Line: Across a series of experiments using the point-light method, pride and shame expressions exerted strong effects upon observers' anticipated emotions, associated cognitions, and performance expectations.Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in two pilot studies we demonstrated that the created pride and shame point-light stimuli were implicitly associated with status and performance related attributes.In conclusion, the present research highlights the potential interpersonal influence of the nonverbal expressions of pride and shame in soccer penalty shootouts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive and Team/Racket Sport Research, German Sport University Cologne Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present research was to investigate the interpersonal effects of pride and shame expressions amongst opponents and teammates in a soccer penalty scenario. Across a series of experiments using the point-light method, pride and shame expressions exerted strong effects upon observers' anticipated emotions, associated cognitions, and performance expectations. Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in two pilot studies we demonstrated that the created pride and shame point-light stimuli were implicitly associated with status and performance related attributes. In Experiment 1, observing pride expressions caused opponents to anticipate more negative emotions, cognitions, and lower performance expectancies toward their next performance in comparison with neutral expressions. In contrast, pride expressions led teammates to anticipate more positive emotions (i.e., pride and happiness), cognitions, and performance expectations toward their next performance than neutral expressions (Experiments 2-4). The results are discussed within the emotions as social information (EASI, Van Kleef, 2009) framework by arguing that the social context has to be taken into account when investigating the interpersonal effects of emotion expressions. In conclusion, the present research highlights the potential interpersonal influence of the nonverbal expressions of pride and shame in soccer penalty shootouts.

No MeSH data available.