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Wearing weighted backpack dilates subjective visual duration: the role of functional linkage between weight experience and visual timing.

Jia L, Shi Z, Feng W - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack.The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception.We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Education, School of Humanities, Jiangnan University Wuxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Bodily state plays a critical role in our perception. In the present study, we asked the question whether and how bodily experience of weights influences time perception. Participants judged durations of a picture (a backpack or a trolley bag) presented on the screen, while wearing different weight backpacks or without backpack. The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack. However, the duration dilation was not manifested for the picture of trolley bag. These findings suggest that weight experience modulates visual duration estimation through the linkage between the wore backpack and to-be-estimated visual target. The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception. We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of Experiment 2. The psychometric functions are fitted for the three weight conditions. The inset figure shows the mean PSEs (SE) for the three conditions (all ∗p < 0.05).
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Figure 4: Results of Experiment 2. The psychometric functions are fitted for the three weight conditions. The inset figure shows the mean PSEs (SE) for the three conditions (all ∗p < 0.05).

Mentions: Experiment 2 changed the identity of the backpack picture, yielding similar results as those of Experiment 1 (Figure 4). The mean PSEs (±SE) were 388 ± 11, 412 ± 10, and 404 ± 13 ms for the weighted, empty backpacks and baseline conditions, respectively (Table 1). The ANOVA revealed that the influence of the feeling of weight on visual duration judgments was significant, F(2,36) = 3.5, p < 0.05, = 0.16. The post-hoc contrasts showed significant differences in PSEs between the weighted and empty backpack conditions, the weighted and baseline conditions, respectively (differences: 24 and 16 ms, both p < 0.05), but no significant difference between the empty backpack and baseline conditions (p = 0.44). A further ANOVA on discrimination sensitivity (JNDs) showed a marginal significance among three conditions, F(2,36) = 3.3, p = 0.05, = 0.16. Further contrast tests indicated that the JND in the weighted backpack condition was significantly lower than that in the empty backpack condition (p < 0.05), while no differences were shown in other comparison conditions (weighted backpack vs. baseline: p = 0.83; empty backpack vs. baseline: p = 0.07).


Wearing weighted backpack dilates subjective visual duration: the role of functional linkage between weight experience and visual timing.

Jia L, Shi Z, Feng W - Front Psychol (2015)

Results of Experiment 2. The psychometric functions are fitted for the three weight conditions. The inset figure shows the mean PSEs (SE) for the three conditions (all ∗p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562260&req=5

Figure 4: Results of Experiment 2. The psychometric functions are fitted for the three weight conditions. The inset figure shows the mean PSEs (SE) for the three conditions (all ∗p < 0.05).
Mentions: Experiment 2 changed the identity of the backpack picture, yielding similar results as those of Experiment 1 (Figure 4). The mean PSEs (±SE) were 388 ± 11, 412 ± 10, and 404 ± 13 ms for the weighted, empty backpacks and baseline conditions, respectively (Table 1). The ANOVA revealed that the influence of the feeling of weight on visual duration judgments was significant, F(2,36) = 3.5, p < 0.05, = 0.16. The post-hoc contrasts showed significant differences in PSEs between the weighted and empty backpack conditions, the weighted and baseline conditions, respectively (differences: 24 and 16 ms, both p < 0.05), but no significant difference between the empty backpack and baseline conditions (p = 0.44). A further ANOVA on discrimination sensitivity (JNDs) showed a marginal significance among three conditions, F(2,36) = 3.3, p = 0.05, = 0.16. Further contrast tests indicated that the JND in the weighted backpack condition was significantly lower than that in the empty backpack condition (p < 0.05), while no differences were shown in other comparison conditions (weighted backpack vs. baseline: p = 0.83; empty backpack vs. baseline: p = 0.07).

Bottom Line: The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack.The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception.We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Education, School of Humanities, Jiangnan University Wuxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Bodily state plays a critical role in our perception. In the present study, we asked the question whether and how bodily experience of weights influences time perception. Participants judged durations of a picture (a backpack or a trolley bag) presented on the screen, while wearing different weight backpacks or without backpack. The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack. However, the duration dilation was not manifested for the picture of trolley bag. These findings suggest that weight experience modulates visual duration estimation through the linkage between the wore backpack and to-be-estimated visual target. The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception. We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus