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Wearing weighted backpack dilates subjective visual duration: the role of functional linkage between weight experience and visual timing.

Jia L, Shi Z, Feng W - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack.The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception.We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Education, School of Humanities, Jiangnan University Wuxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Bodily state plays a critical role in our perception. In the present study, we asked the question whether and how bodily experience of weights influences time perception. Participants judged durations of a picture (a backpack or a trolley bag) presented on the screen, while wearing different weight backpacks or without backpack. The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack. However, the duration dilation was not manifested for the picture of trolley bag. These findings suggest that weight experience modulates visual duration estimation through the linkage between the wore backpack and to-be-estimated visual target. The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception. We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of a trial sequence. Note that the target picture was a blue backpack, an orange backpack, and a trolley bag in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively.
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Figure 2: Illustration of a trial sequence. Note that the target picture was a blue backpack, an orange backpack, and a trolley bag in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Mentions: In the subsequent test session, illustrated in Figure 2, each trial started with a fixation cross for 500 ms, followed by a blank display randomly for 500∼800 ms. Then a target picture (backpack in Experiments 1 and 2, trolley bag in Experiment 3) was presented for a given probe duration, randomly selected from 200, 300, 400, 500, or 600 ms. After the picture presentation, a question mark was shown to prompt for a response. Participants had to judge whether the duration of the picture was closer to the short anchor (200 ms) or the long anchor (600 ms) as accurately as possible by pressing the left or right key on the response box, respectively. The inter-trial interval (ITI) varied randomly from 1000 to 1500 ms.


Wearing weighted backpack dilates subjective visual duration: the role of functional linkage between weight experience and visual timing.

Jia L, Shi Z, Feng W - Front Psychol (2015)

Illustration of a trial sequence. Note that the target picture was a blue backpack, an orange backpack, and a trolley bag in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562260&req=5

Figure 2: Illustration of a trial sequence. Note that the target picture was a blue backpack, an orange backpack, and a trolley bag in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively.
Mentions: In the subsequent test session, illustrated in Figure 2, each trial started with a fixation cross for 500 ms, followed by a blank display randomly for 500∼800 ms. Then a target picture (backpack in Experiments 1 and 2, trolley bag in Experiment 3) was presented for a given probe duration, randomly selected from 200, 300, 400, 500, or 600 ms. After the picture presentation, a question mark was shown to prompt for a response. Participants had to judge whether the duration of the picture was closer to the short anchor (200 ms) or the long anchor (600 ms) as accurately as possible by pressing the left or right key on the response box, respectively. The inter-trial interval (ITI) varied randomly from 1000 to 1500 ms.

Bottom Line: The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack.The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception.We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Education, School of Humanities, Jiangnan University Wuxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Bodily state plays a critical role in our perception. In the present study, we asked the question whether and how bodily experience of weights influences time perception. Participants judged durations of a picture (a backpack or a trolley bag) presented on the screen, while wearing different weight backpacks or without backpack. The results showed that the subjective duration of the backpack picture was dilated when participants wore a medium weighted backpack relative to an empty backpack or without backpack, regardless of identity (e.g., color) of the visual backpack. However, the duration dilation was not manifested for the picture of trolley bag. These findings suggest that weight experience modulates visual duration estimation through the linkage between the wore backpack and to-be-estimated visual target. The congruent action affordance between the wore backpack and visual inputs plays a critical role in the functional linkage between inner experience and time perception. We interpreted our findings within the framework of embodied time perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus