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An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals.

Frasier CC - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal's means of propulsion.Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal's BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals.This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass) (b) . Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal's characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal's means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals' skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal's BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals. However for many of the addressed MMLE homogeneous groups, MMLE can predict the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the BMR and mass data using the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the mass and length data. This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Log BMR as a function of log body mass for heavy and light bats.The solid and dashed lines are the MMLE sturdiness factor boundaries. The upper boundaries were generated with a sturdiness factor s = (3)0.5. The lower boundaries were generated with s = (3)−0.5. The steeper sloping solid boundary lines are for heavy bat Strouhal dynamic similarity. The shallower sloping dashed boundary lines are for light bat geometric similarity.  for heavy bats with respect to the Strouhal boundaries.  for light bats with respect to the geometric boundaries. Heavy bat species-averaged data are marked with Xes. Light bats species-averaged data are marked with open rectangles. Data was available for only four of the eight families comprising the light bats.
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fig-9: Log BMR as a function of log body mass for heavy and light bats.The solid and dashed lines are the MMLE sturdiness factor boundaries. The upper boundaries were generated with a sturdiness factor s = (3)0.5. The lower boundaries were generated with s = (3)−0.5. The steeper sloping solid boundary lines are for heavy bat Strouhal dynamic similarity. The shallower sloping dashed boundary lines are for light bat geometric similarity. for heavy bats with respect to the Strouhal boundaries. for light bats with respect to the geometric boundaries. Heavy bat species-averaged data are marked with Xes. Light bats species-averaged data are marked with open rectangles. Data was available for only four of the eight families comprising the light bats.

Mentions: Figure 9 shows the MMLE BMR as a function of body mass boundaries for geometric similarity for light bats evaluated with these estimates.


An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals.

Frasier CC - PeerJ (2015)

Log BMR as a function of log body mass for heavy and light bats.The solid and dashed lines are the MMLE sturdiness factor boundaries. The upper boundaries were generated with a sturdiness factor s = (3)0.5. The lower boundaries were generated with s = (3)−0.5. The steeper sloping solid boundary lines are for heavy bat Strouhal dynamic similarity. The shallower sloping dashed boundary lines are for light bat geometric similarity.  for heavy bats with respect to the Strouhal boundaries.  for light bats with respect to the geometric boundaries. Heavy bat species-averaged data are marked with Xes. Light bats species-averaged data are marked with open rectangles. Data was available for only four of the eight families comprising the light bats.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562252&req=5

fig-9: Log BMR as a function of log body mass for heavy and light bats.The solid and dashed lines are the MMLE sturdiness factor boundaries. The upper boundaries were generated with a sturdiness factor s = (3)0.5. The lower boundaries were generated with s = (3)−0.5. The steeper sloping solid boundary lines are for heavy bat Strouhal dynamic similarity. The shallower sloping dashed boundary lines are for light bat geometric similarity. for heavy bats with respect to the Strouhal boundaries. for light bats with respect to the geometric boundaries. Heavy bat species-averaged data are marked with Xes. Light bats species-averaged data are marked with open rectangles. Data was available for only four of the eight families comprising the light bats.
Mentions: Figure 9 shows the MMLE BMR as a function of body mass boundaries for geometric similarity for light bats evaluated with these estimates.

Bottom Line: The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal's means of propulsion.Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal's BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals.This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass) (b) . Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal's characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal's means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals' skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal's BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals. However for many of the addressed MMLE homogeneous groups, MMLE can predict the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the BMR and mass data using the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the mass and length data. This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus