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Visual Features: Featural Strength and Visual Strength Are Two Dissociable Dimensions.

Huang L - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task.The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks.The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Visual features are often assumed to be the general building blocks for various visual tasks. However, it is well known that some stimulus categories (i.e., basic features) can be processed in parallel, but others (e.g., Ts in different orientations) need to be scanned serially, and this difference in featural strength seems to be on a fundamentally different dimension from differences in visual strength (e.g., reduction in contrast). This study compared two high-level tasks, namely tasks that require a lot of attentional operations (change detection and pattern comparison), with one low-level task, namely a task that requires few attentional operations (perceptual discrimination). The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task. The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks. Overall, featural strength and visual strength are two dissociable dimensions in processing of visual features. The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of the stimuli used.The present experiments used three types of stimuli: (1) basic shapes serving as the “baseline” condition, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes for the “decreased visual strength” condition, and (3) Ts in different orientations for the “decreased featural strength” condition.
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f1: Examples of the stimuli used.The present experiments used three types of stimuli: (1) basic shapes serving as the “baseline” condition, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes for the “decreased visual strength” condition, and (3) Ts in different orientations for the “decreased featural strength” condition.

Mentions: For manipulating the stimuli on the two dimensions of featural strength and visual strength, this study used three types of stimuli (Fig. 1): (1) basic shapes, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes, and (3) Ts in different orientations.


Visual Features: Featural Strength and Visual Strength Are Two Dissociable Dimensions.

Huang L - Sci Rep (2015)

Examples of the stimuli used.The present experiments used three types of stimuli: (1) basic shapes serving as the “baseline” condition, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes for the “decreased visual strength” condition, and (3) Ts in different orientations for the “decreased featural strength” condition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562251&req=5

f1: Examples of the stimuli used.The present experiments used three types of stimuli: (1) basic shapes serving as the “baseline” condition, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes for the “decreased visual strength” condition, and (3) Ts in different orientations for the “decreased featural strength” condition.
Mentions: For manipulating the stimuli on the two dimensions of featural strength and visual strength, this study used three types of stimuli (Fig. 1): (1) basic shapes, (2) a low-contrast version of basic shapes, and (3) Ts in different orientations.

Bottom Line: The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task.The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks.The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Visual features are often assumed to be the general building blocks for various visual tasks. However, it is well known that some stimulus categories (i.e., basic features) can be processed in parallel, but others (e.g., Ts in different orientations) need to be scanned serially, and this difference in featural strength seems to be on a fundamentally different dimension from differences in visual strength (e.g., reduction in contrast). This study compared two high-level tasks, namely tasks that require a lot of attentional operations (change detection and pattern comparison), with one low-level task, namely a task that requires few attentional operations (perceptual discrimination). The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task. The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks. Overall, featural strength and visual strength are two dissociable dimensions in processing of visual features. The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features.

No MeSH data available.