Limits...
Revealing the nanoparticles aspect ratio in the glass-metal nanocomposites irradiated with femtosecond laser.

Chervinskii S, Drevinskas R, Karpov DV, Beresna M, Lipovskii AA, Svirko YP, Kazansky PG - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Comparing experimental absorption spectra with the modeling based on Maxwell Garnett approximation modified for spheroidal inclusions, we obtained the mean aspect ratio of the re-shaped silver nanoparticles as a function of the laser fluence.We demonstrated that under our experimental conditions the spherical shape of silver nanoparticles changed to a prolate spheroid with the aspect ratio as high as 3.5 at the laser fluence of 0.6 J/cm2.The developed approach can be employed to control the anisotropy of the glass-metal composites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 111 Joensuu, FI-80101 Finland.

ABSTRACT
We studied a femtosecond laser shaping of silver nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime glass. Comparing experimental absorption spectra with the modeling based on Maxwell Garnett approximation modified for spheroidal inclusions, we obtained the mean aspect ratio of the re-shaped silver nanoparticles as a function of the laser fluence. We demonstrated that under our experimental conditions the spherical shape of silver nanoparticles changed to a prolate spheroid with the aspect ratio as high as 3.5 at the laser fluence of 0.6 J/cm2. The developed approach can be employed to control the anisotropy of the glass-metal composites.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup of femtosecond laser modification: femtosecond laser (FSL), second harmonic generator (SHG), half-wave plates (λ/2), polarizer (Pol), power meter (PM), flip-mirror (F-M) allowing to send the radiation to the power meter (PM), dichroic mirrors (M), lens (L), objective lens (0.21 NA), XYZ translation stage.Laser processing was monitored by CCD camera. Inset shows the optical transmission (T) and reflection (R) images of laser-modified regions of GMN (of 1 × 1 mm2) irradiated with various laser fluences. Black arrow indicates the laser writing direction, red arrow—the state of polarization. Drawn by Rokas Drevinskas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562248&req=5

f1: Experimental setup of femtosecond laser modification: femtosecond laser (FSL), second harmonic generator (SHG), half-wave plates (λ/2), polarizer (Pol), power meter (PM), flip-mirror (F-M) allowing to send the radiation to the power meter (PM), dichroic mirrors (M), lens (L), objective lens (0.21 NA), XYZ translation stage.Laser processing was monitored by CCD camera. Inset shows the optical transmission (T) and reflection (R) images of laser-modified regions of GMN (of 1 × 1 mm2) irradiated with various laser fluences. Black arrow indicates the laser writing direction, red arrow—the state of polarization. Drawn by Rokas Drevinskas.

Mentions: In order to investigate the laser modification of the GMN, the sample was irradiated with 330 fs pulses generated by regeneratively amplified, mode-locked Yb:KGW based ultrafast laser system (Pharos, Light Conversion Ltd.) operating at 515 nm (frequency doubled) at a 20 kHz repetition rate. We irradiated the series of 1 × 1 mm2 square regions of the sample by writing 1 mm lines with 2 μm interline distance. The writing speed was 0.5 mm/s, and the laser pulse energy was controlled by a half-wave plate and linear polarizer (Fig. 1) and varied in the range of 0.01–0.065 μJ for different squares. The laser beam was polarized parallel to the writing direction. The beam was focused inside the substrate via a 0.21 NA objective lens providing a net fluence of 0.25–1.625 J/cm2 (0.76–4.9 TW/cm2), each point under the beam was irradiated with ~60 laser pulses. For a set of laser energies the series of squares were written (Inset in Fig. 1).


Revealing the nanoparticles aspect ratio in the glass-metal nanocomposites irradiated with femtosecond laser.

Chervinskii S, Drevinskas R, Karpov DV, Beresna M, Lipovskii AA, Svirko YP, Kazansky PG - Sci Rep (2015)

Experimental setup of femtosecond laser modification: femtosecond laser (FSL), second harmonic generator (SHG), half-wave plates (λ/2), polarizer (Pol), power meter (PM), flip-mirror (F-M) allowing to send the radiation to the power meter (PM), dichroic mirrors (M), lens (L), objective lens (0.21 NA), XYZ translation stage.Laser processing was monitored by CCD camera. Inset shows the optical transmission (T) and reflection (R) images of laser-modified regions of GMN (of 1 × 1 mm2) irradiated with various laser fluences. Black arrow indicates the laser writing direction, red arrow—the state of polarization. Drawn by Rokas Drevinskas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562248&req=5

f1: Experimental setup of femtosecond laser modification: femtosecond laser (FSL), second harmonic generator (SHG), half-wave plates (λ/2), polarizer (Pol), power meter (PM), flip-mirror (F-M) allowing to send the radiation to the power meter (PM), dichroic mirrors (M), lens (L), objective lens (0.21 NA), XYZ translation stage.Laser processing was monitored by CCD camera. Inset shows the optical transmission (T) and reflection (R) images of laser-modified regions of GMN (of 1 × 1 mm2) irradiated with various laser fluences. Black arrow indicates the laser writing direction, red arrow—the state of polarization. Drawn by Rokas Drevinskas.
Mentions: In order to investigate the laser modification of the GMN, the sample was irradiated with 330 fs pulses generated by regeneratively amplified, mode-locked Yb:KGW based ultrafast laser system (Pharos, Light Conversion Ltd.) operating at 515 nm (frequency doubled) at a 20 kHz repetition rate. We irradiated the series of 1 × 1 mm2 square regions of the sample by writing 1 mm lines with 2 μm interline distance. The writing speed was 0.5 mm/s, and the laser pulse energy was controlled by a half-wave plate and linear polarizer (Fig. 1) and varied in the range of 0.01–0.065 μJ for different squares. The laser beam was polarized parallel to the writing direction. The beam was focused inside the substrate via a 0.21 NA objective lens providing a net fluence of 0.25–1.625 J/cm2 (0.76–4.9 TW/cm2), each point under the beam was irradiated with ~60 laser pulses. For a set of laser energies the series of squares were written (Inset in Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Comparing experimental absorption spectra with the modeling based on Maxwell Garnett approximation modified for spheroidal inclusions, we obtained the mean aspect ratio of the re-shaped silver nanoparticles as a function of the laser fluence.We demonstrated that under our experimental conditions the spherical shape of silver nanoparticles changed to a prolate spheroid with the aspect ratio as high as 3.5 at the laser fluence of 0.6 J/cm2.The developed approach can be employed to control the anisotropy of the glass-metal composites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 111 Joensuu, FI-80101 Finland.

ABSTRACT
We studied a femtosecond laser shaping of silver nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime glass. Comparing experimental absorption spectra with the modeling based on Maxwell Garnett approximation modified for spheroidal inclusions, we obtained the mean aspect ratio of the re-shaped silver nanoparticles as a function of the laser fluence. We demonstrated that under our experimental conditions the spherical shape of silver nanoparticles changed to a prolate spheroid with the aspect ratio as high as 3.5 at the laser fluence of 0.6 J/cm2. The developed approach can be employed to control the anisotropy of the glass-metal composites.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus