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Perceived barriers to pharmacist engagement in adverse drug event prevention activities in Ghana using semi-structured interview.

Acheampong F, Anto BP - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development.The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training.Proper initiation and maintenance of collaborative working relationship in hospitals is desired between the healthcare team members to benefit from the medication safety services of hospital pharmacists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmacy Department, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. franklinach@hotmail.co.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pharmacist involvement in the prevention of medication errors is well documented. One such method, the process by which hospital pharmacists undertake these clinical interventions needs to be described and documented. The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development. This study was therefore to trace the typical process involved and explore the perceived barriers to pharmacists' medication safety efforts.

Methods: This study involved a retrospective evaluation of routine clinical interventions collected at a tertiary hospital in Ghana over 23 months. A sample of pharmacists who had submitted these reports were then interviewed.

Results: The interventions made related to drug therapy changes (76.0%), monitoring (13.0%), communication (5.4%), counselling (5.0%) and adverse drug events (0.6%). More than 90% of interventions were accepted. The results also showed that undertaking clinical interventions by pharmacists followed a sequential order with two interlinked subprocesses: Problem Identification and Problem Handling. In identifying the problem, as much information needed to be gathered, clinical issues identified and then the problems prioritised. During the problem handling stage, detailed assessment was made which led to the development of a pharmaceutical plan. The plan was then implemented and monitored to ensure appropriateness of desired outcomes. The main barrier mentioned by pharmacist related to the discrepant attitudes of doctors/nurses. The other barriers encountered during these tasks related to workload, and inadequate clinical knowledge. The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training.

Conclusions: Though the majority of recommendations from pharmacists were accepted, the main barrier to hospital pharmacist engagement in medication error prevention activities related to discrepant attitudes of doctors and nurses. Proper initiation and maintenance of collaborative working relationship in hospitals is desired between the healthcare team members to benefit from the medication safety services of hospital pharmacists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stages of Thematic Content analysis of interviews recommended by Braun and Clarke adopted from ‘Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study’ by Lawton et al. [36]
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Fig1: Stages of Thematic Content analysis of interviews recommended by Braun and Clarke adopted from ‘Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study’ by Lawton et al. [36]

Mentions: The study involved a retrospective evaluation of clinical intervention reports of hospital pharmacists who were engaged in direct patient care. This was almost immediately followed by key informant interviews with sampled pharmacists whose clinical intervention reports had been evaluated. Interview techniques are useful in gaining rich insight into a subject matter. Researchers used interviews to explore the possible causes of different types of medication errors [8–11]. The interview process probes and provides detailed information as well as other useful information that the researcher had not considered prior to the start of a study. Authors have pointed to the utility of interview techniques in gaining rich information regarding patient safety incidents [12, 13]. Interviews were then subjected to thematic content analysis. Braun and Clarke [14] developed the five stages of content analysis which has been described in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Perceived barriers to pharmacist engagement in adverse drug event prevention activities in Ghana using semi-structured interview.

Acheampong F, Anto BP - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Stages of Thematic Content analysis of interviews recommended by Braun and Clarke adopted from ‘Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study’ by Lawton et al. [36]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562207&req=5

Fig1: Stages of Thematic Content analysis of interviews recommended by Braun and Clarke adopted from ‘Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study’ by Lawton et al. [36]
Mentions: The study involved a retrospective evaluation of clinical intervention reports of hospital pharmacists who were engaged in direct patient care. This was almost immediately followed by key informant interviews with sampled pharmacists whose clinical intervention reports had been evaluated. Interview techniques are useful in gaining rich insight into a subject matter. Researchers used interviews to explore the possible causes of different types of medication errors [8–11]. The interview process probes and provides detailed information as well as other useful information that the researcher had not considered prior to the start of a study. Authors have pointed to the utility of interview techniques in gaining rich information regarding patient safety incidents [12, 13]. Interviews were then subjected to thematic content analysis. Braun and Clarke [14] developed the five stages of content analysis which has been described in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development.The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training.Proper initiation and maintenance of collaborative working relationship in hospitals is desired between the healthcare team members to benefit from the medication safety services of hospital pharmacists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmacy Department, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. franklinach@hotmail.co.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pharmacist involvement in the prevention of medication errors is well documented. One such method, the process by which hospital pharmacists undertake these clinical interventions needs to be described and documented. The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development. This study was therefore to trace the typical process involved and explore the perceived barriers to pharmacists' medication safety efforts.

Methods: This study involved a retrospective evaluation of routine clinical interventions collected at a tertiary hospital in Ghana over 23 months. A sample of pharmacists who had submitted these reports were then interviewed.

Results: The interventions made related to drug therapy changes (76.0%), monitoring (13.0%), communication (5.4%), counselling (5.0%) and adverse drug events (0.6%). More than 90% of interventions were accepted. The results also showed that undertaking clinical interventions by pharmacists followed a sequential order with two interlinked subprocesses: Problem Identification and Problem Handling. In identifying the problem, as much information needed to be gathered, clinical issues identified and then the problems prioritised. During the problem handling stage, detailed assessment was made which led to the development of a pharmaceutical plan. The plan was then implemented and monitored to ensure appropriateness of desired outcomes. The main barrier mentioned by pharmacist related to the discrepant attitudes of doctors/nurses. The other barriers encountered during these tasks related to workload, and inadequate clinical knowledge. The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training.

Conclusions: Though the majority of recommendations from pharmacists were accepted, the main barrier to hospital pharmacist engagement in medication error prevention activities related to discrepant attitudes of doctors and nurses. Proper initiation and maintenance of collaborative working relationship in hospitals is desired between the healthcare team members to benefit from the medication safety services of hospital pharmacists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus