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Draft genome of Brugia pahangi: high similarity between B. pahangi and B. malayi.

Lau YL, Lee WC, Xia J, Zhang G, Razali R, Anwar A, Fong MY - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, 166 genes were considered to be unique to B. pahangi, which may be responsible for the distinct properties of B. pahangi as compared to other filarial nematodes.The reporting of B. pahangi draft genome contributes to genomic archive.Albeit with high similarity to B. malayi genome, the B. pahangi-unique genes found in this study may serve as new focus to study differences in virulence, vector selection and host adaptability among different Brugia spp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. lauyeeling@um.edu.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: Efforts to completely eradicate lymphatic filariasis from human population may be challenged by the emergence of Brugia pahangi as another zoonotic lymphatic filarial nematode. In this report, a genomic study was conducted to understand this species at molecular level.

Methods: After blood meal on a B. pahangi-harbouring cat, the Aedes togoi mosquitoes were maintained to harvest infective third stage larvae, which were then injected into male Mongolian gerbils. Subsequently, adult B. pahangi were obtained from the infected gerbil for genomic DNA extraction. Sequencing and subsequently, construction of genomic libraries were performed. This was followed by genomic analyses and gene annotation analysis. By using archived protein sequences of B. malayi and a few other nematodes, clustering of gene orthologs and phylogenetics were conducted.

Results: A total of 9687 coding genes were predicted. The genome of B. pahangi shared high similarity to that B. malayi genome, particularly genes annotated to fundamental processes. Nevertheless, 166 genes were considered to be unique to B. pahangi, which may be responsible for the distinct properties of B. pahangi as compared to other filarial nematodes. In addition, 803 genes were deduced to be derived from Wolbachia, an endosymbiont bacterium, with 44 of these genes intercalate into the nematode genome.

Conclusions: The reporting of B. pahangi draft genome contributes to genomic archive. Albeit with high similarity to B. malayi genome, the B. pahangi-unique genes found in this study may serve as new focus to study differences in virulence, vector selection and host adaptability among different Brugia spp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A phylogenetic tree constructed based on an ATPase protein coding gene in Wolbachia-B. pahangi (Brugia.Pahangi_GLEAN_10000840). The tree indicates that this gene is in the same clade with an ATPase in Wolbachia-Brugia malayi. The tree was generated using neighbour-joining algorithm using Kimura distance model
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Fig3: A phylogenetic tree constructed based on an ATPase protein coding gene in Wolbachia-B. pahangi (Brugia.Pahangi_GLEAN_10000840). The tree indicates that this gene is in the same clade with an ATPase in Wolbachia-Brugia malayi. The tree was generated using neighbour-joining algorithm using Kimura distance model

Mentions: From the B. pahangi genome, 803 genes were homologuos to B. malayi Wolbachia genes and most of the genes were mapped to 4 distinct scaffolds (Additional file 1: Table S13), which consisted entirely of Wolbachia genes, implying presence of a region of genome which is not integrated within the filarial nematode. Interestingly, 44 of the Wolbachia-derived genes were found to be incorporated within other parts of the genome other than the aforementioned 4 distinct scaffolds, suggesting gene integration via lateral transfer between the endosymbiotic bacteria and the filarial nematode. As mentioned earlier, many B. pahangi-unique genes were found to be derived from its endosymbiont Wolbachia. Among these Wolbachia genes, 45 genes were mapped to metabolic pathways and features that are unique to the species, 29 genes were linked to genetic information processing pathways, 7 were involved in environmental information processing, 4 were associated with cellular processes, 7 genes were mapped to human disease pathways, and 2 genes were linked to organismal systems. In addition, 3 Wolbachia genes were of unknown function. We proposed that the Wolbachia genes may contribute to at least some of the unique characteristics of B. pahangi. These genes may complement B. pahangi cellular machinery, which further confer survival advantage to the filarial nematode within its mosquito vectors and mammalian hosts. Overall, phylogenetic analysis shows that Wolbachia of B. pahangi is phylogenetically close to Wolbachia of B. malayi (Fig. 3), which is parallel to the evolutionary relationship between the involving nematode hosts.Fig. 3


Draft genome of Brugia pahangi: high similarity between B. pahangi and B. malayi.

Lau YL, Lee WC, Xia J, Zhang G, Razali R, Anwar A, Fong MY - Parasit Vectors (2015)

A phylogenetic tree constructed based on an ATPase protein coding gene in Wolbachia-B. pahangi (Brugia.Pahangi_GLEAN_10000840). The tree indicates that this gene is in the same clade with an ATPase in Wolbachia-Brugia malayi. The tree was generated using neighbour-joining algorithm using Kimura distance model
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562187&req=5

Fig3: A phylogenetic tree constructed based on an ATPase protein coding gene in Wolbachia-B. pahangi (Brugia.Pahangi_GLEAN_10000840). The tree indicates that this gene is in the same clade with an ATPase in Wolbachia-Brugia malayi. The tree was generated using neighbour-joining algorithm using Kimura distance model
Mentions: From the B. pahangi genome, 803 genes were homologuos to B. malayi Wolbachia genes and most of the genes were mapped to 4 distinct scaffolds (Additional file 1: Table S13), which consisted entirely of Wolbachia genes, implying presence of a region of genome which is not integrated within the filarial nematode. Interestingly, 44 of the Wolbachia-derived genes were found to be incorporated within other parts of the genome other than the aforementioned 4 distinct scaffolds, suggesting gene integration via lateral transfer between the endosymbiotic bacteria and the filarial nematode. As mentioned earlier, many B. pahangi-unique genes were found to be derived from its endosymbiont Wolbachia. Among these Wolbachia genes, 45 genes were mapped to metabolic pathways and features that are unique to the species, 29 genes were linked to genetic information processing pathways, 7 were involved in environmental information processing, 4 were associated with cellular processes, 7 genes were mapped to human disease pathways, and 2 genes were linked to organismal systems. In addition, 3 Wolbachia genes were of unknown function. We proposed that the Wolbachia genes may contribute to at least some of the unique characteristics of B. pahangi. These genes may complement B. pahangi cellular machinery, which further confer survival advantage to the filarial nematode within its mosquito vectors and mammalian hosts. Overall, phylogenetic analysis shows that Wolbachia of B. pahangi is phylogenetically close to Wolbachia of B. malayi (Fig. 3), which is parallel to the evolutionary relationship between the involving nematode hosts.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, 166 genes were considered to be unique to B. pahangi, which may be responsible for the distinct properties of B. pahangi as compared to other filarial nematodes.The reporting of B. pahangi draft genome contributes to genomic archive.Albeit with high similarity to B. malayi genome, the B. pahangi-unique genes found in this study may serve as new focus to study differences in virulence, vector selection and host adaptability among different Brugia spp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. lauyeeling@um.edu.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: Efforts to completely eradicate lymphatic filariasis from human population may be challenged by the emergence of Brugia pahangi as another zoonotic lymphatic filarial nematode. In this report, a genomic study was conducted to understand this species at molecular level.

Methods: After blood meal on a B. pahangi-harbouring cat, the Aedes togoi mosquitoes were maintained to harvest infective third stage larvae, which were then injected into male Mongolian gerbils. Subsequently, adult B. pahangi were obtained from the infected gerbil for genomic DNA extraction. Sequencing and subsequently, construction of genomic libraries were performed. This was followed by genomic analyses and gene annotation analysis. By using archived protein sequences of B. malayi and a few other nematodes, clustering of gene orthologs and phylogenetics were conducted.

Results: A total of 9687 coding genes were predicted. The genome of B. pahangi shared high similarity to that B. malayi genome, particularly genes annotated to fundamental processes. Nevertheless, 166 genes were considered to be unique to B. pahangi, which may be responsible for the distinct properties of B. pahangi as compared to other filarial nematodes. In addition, 803 genes were deduced to be derived from Wolbachia, an endosymbiont bacterium, with 44 of these genes intercalate into the nematode genome.

Conclusions: The reporting of B. pahangi draft genome contributes to genomic archive. Albeit with high similarity to B. malayi genome, the B. pahangi-unique genes found in this study may serve as new focus to study differences in virulence, vector selection and host adaptability among different Brugia spp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus