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Are exergames promoting mobility an attractive alternative to conventional self-regulated exercises for elderly people in a rehabilitation setting? Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

Hasselmann V, Oesch P, Fernandez-Luque L, Bachmann S - BMC Geriatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Maintaining mobility in elderly persons has become a primary goal within healthcare services.They are often considered tedious and boring, and thus prematurely stopped.The primary outcome is the performed daily training volume, collected by the participants in a logbook.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehabilitationsklinik Walenstadtberg, Walenstadtberg, Switzerland. viviane.hasselmann@wanadoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Maintaining mobility in elderly persons has become a primary goal within healthcare services. In older adults, exercise programs significantly reduce the risk of falling and death. Long-lasting and high-intensive multi-component exercises are most effective. In a rehabilitation setting, self-regulated exercises are conventionally taught by physiotherapists, using handouts. However, the adherence of elderly persons to executing these self-administered programs varies considerably. They are often considered tedious and boring, and thus prematurely stopped. The primary aim of this clinical trial is to determine whether elderly persons in a rehabilitation setting show higher adherence to self-regulated training when using exergames than when performing conventional exercises. The second objective is to explore which mode of exercise leads to greater improvement in balance performance.

Methods/design: The study consists of a single blind, stratified, randomized control trial with two parallel groups. Once included, study participants will be stratified according to their balance and computer skills and randomly allocated to self-regulated training with conventional exercise programs or with exergames played with the Windows Kinect® sensor and FitBit® pedometer. In both groups, self-administered exercise programs will be taught by experienced physiotherapists and performed at the patient's own discretion during the ten days of intervention. The primary outcome is the performed daily training volume, collected by the participants in a logbook. Secondary outcomes are objective and subjective balance skills measured by an activity tracker and the Fall Efficacy Scale self-administered questionnaire. Both assessments will be performed at pre- and post-intervention.

Discussion: According to the available literature, this study is the first to compare conventional self-regulated exercises with exergames among older patients in a rehabilitation setting. Results of this study will contribute to our understanding of its motivational potential on exercise adherence in elderly persons and provide more insight into the potential effectiveness of exergames promoting mobility.

Trial registration: The present clinical study has been registered on ClinicalTrials.gov under the identifier number: NCT02077049. The detailed trial protocol can be accessed online on: NCT02077049.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study time flow. The researcher performs the subjective and objective balance tests (BBS, ActiGraph and FES-I) at the time point T1 (see Fig. 2) and grades the patient’s computer skills. Participants are then stratified into four groups and allocated randomly in the intervention group or the control group. During the two days preceding the start of the self-regulated training program (i.e., time points I1 and I2 in Fig. 2), the patient is instructed on how to perform the self-regulated exercise program according to his allocated group. The intervention period for the self-regulated training program lasts two weeks, namely 10 working days (from Monday to Friday each). On day 11 at the end of the intervention phase (time point T2), the subjective and objective balance skills are again tested by the researcher
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Fig2: Study time flow. The researcher performs the subjective and objective balance tests (BBS, ActiGraph and FES-I) at the time point T1 (see Fig. 2) and grades the patient’s computer skills. Participants are then stratified into four groups and allocated randomly in the intervention group or the control group. During the two days preceding the start of the self-regulated training program (i.e., time points I1 and I2 in Fig. 2), the patient is instructed on how to perform the self-regulated exercise program according to his allocated group. The intervention period for the self-regulated training program lasts two weeks, namely 10 working days (from Monday to Friday each). On day 11 at the end of the intervention phase (time point T2), the subjective and objective balance skills are again tested by the researcher

Mentions: All study participants will be entitled to two time-slots (2 × 30mins per day) from Monday to Friday, dedicated to self-regulated training for ten working days. This is communicated via the printed weekly therapy program containing the various medical appointments and therapy sessions of each day. Before the intervention starts, patients will receive two instruction sessions given by a trained physiotherapist on how to perform the self-regulated training (conventional or exergames). Additionally all patients are encouraged to walk and climb stairs instead of using the lift. This protocol ensures that all participants will receive the same attention at the beginning of the study and will be equally motivated to perform self-regulated training. Figure 2 shows the study time flow.Fig. 2


Are exergames promoting mobility an attractive alternative to conventional self-regulated exercises for elderly people in a rehabilitation setting? Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

Hasselmann V, Oesch P, Fernandez-Luque L, Bachmann S - BMC Geriatr (2015)

Study time flow. The researcher performs the subjective and objective balance tests (BBS, ActiGraph and FES-I) at the time point T1 (see Fig. 2) and grades the patient’s computer skills. Participants are then stratified into four groups and allocated randomly in the intervention group or the control group. During the two days preceding the start of the self-regulated training program (i.e., time points I1 and I2 in Fig. 2), the patient is instructed on how to perform the self-regulated exercise program according to his allocated group. The intervention period for the self-regulated training program lasts two weeks, namely 10 working days (from Monday to Friday each). On day 11 at the end of the intervention phase (time point T2), the subjective and objective balance skills are again tested by the researcher
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562105&req=5

Fig2: Study time flow. The researcher performs the subjective and objective balance tests (BBS, ActiGraph and FES-I) at the time point T1 (see Fig. 2) and grades the patient’s computer skills. Participants are then stratified into four groups and allocated randomly in the intervention group or the control group. During the two days preceding the start of the self-regulated training program (i.e., time points I1 and I2 in Fig. 2), the patient is instructed on how to perform the self-regulated exercise program according to his allocated group. The intervention period for the self-regulated training program lasts two weeks, namely 10 working days (from Monday to Friday each). On day 11 at the end of the intervention phase (time point T2), the subjective and objective balance skills are again tested by the researcher
Mentions: All study participants will be entitled to two time-slots (2 × 30mins per day) from Monday to Friday, dedicated to self-regulated training for ten working days. This is communicated via the printed weekly therapy program containing the various medical appointments and therapy sessions of each day. Before the intervention starts, patients will receive two instruction sessions given by a trained physiotherapist on how to perform the self-regulated training (conventional or exergames). Additionally all patients are encouraged to walk and climb stairs instead of using the lift. This protocol ensures that all participants will receive the same attention at the beginning of the study and will be equally motivated to perform self-regulated training. Figure 2 shows the study time flow.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Maintaining mobility in elderly persons has become a primary goal within healthcare services.They are often considered tedious and boring, and thus prematurely stopped.The primary outcome is the performed daily training volume, collected by the participants in a logbook.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehabilitationsklinik Walenstadtberg, Walenstadtberg, Switzerland. viviane.hasselmann@wanadoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Maintaining mobility in elderly persons has become a primary goal within healthcare services. In older adults, exercise programs significantly reduce the risk of falling and death. Long-lasting and high-intensive multi-component exercises are most effective. In a rehabilitation setting, self-regulated exercises are conventionally taught by physiotherapists, using handouts. However, the adherence of elderly persons to executing these self-administered programs varies considerably. They are often considered tedious and boring, and thus prematurely stopped. The primary aim of this clinical trial is to determine whether elderly persons in a rehabilitation setting show higher adherence to self-regulated training when using exergames than when performing conventional exercises. The second objective is to explore which mode of exercise leads to greater improvement in balance performance.

Methods/design: The study consists of a single blind, stratified, randomized control trial with two parallel groups. Once included, study participants will be stratified according to their balance and computer skills and randomly allocated to self-regulated training with conventional exercise programs or with exergames played with the Windows Kinect® sensor and FitBit® pedometer. In both groups, self-administered exercise programs will be taught by experienced physiotherapists and performed at the patient's own discretion during the ten days of intervention. The primary outcome is the performed daily training volume, collected by the participants in a logbook. Secondary outcomes are objective and subjective balance skills measured by an activity tracker and the Fall Efficacy Scale self-administered questionnaire. Both assessments will be performed at pre- and post-intervention.

Discussion: According to the available literature, this study is the first to compare conventional self-regulated exercises with exergames among older patients in a rehabilitation setting. Results of this study will contribute to our understanding of its motivational potential on exercise adherence in elderly persons and provide more insight into the potential effectiveness of exergames promoting mobility.

Trial registration: The present clinical study has been registered on ClinicalTrials.gov under the identifier number: NCT02077049. The detailed trial protocol can be accessed online on: NCT02077049.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus