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Primo Vascular System: An Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Potential Transitional Tissue Involved in Gastric Cancer Metastasis.

Ping A, Zhendong S, Rongmei Q, Jingxing D, Wei C, Zhongyin Z, Hesheng L, Soh KS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We observed blood vessel-mediated metastasis, primo vessel-mediated metastasis, and an intermediate state between them.We deduced that primo vessels may be precursors of blood vessels.These results possibly provided a thoroughly new theoretic development in cancer metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
Gastric cancer is the fourth commonest cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Investigation of gastric cancer metastasis is one of the hottest and major focuses in cancer research. Growing evidence manifested that primo vascular system (PVS) is a new kind of circulatory system beyond vascular and lymphatic system. Previous researches revealed that PVS is a specific tissue between endothelium and mesenchyme and is involved in cancer, especially in tumor metastasis and regeneration. In current study, we investigated the role of primo vessels in gastric cancer metastasis and its possible relationship to vascular vessels formation. Our results indicated that primo vessels were involved in gastric cancer metastasis. We observed blood vessel-mediated metastasis, primo vessel-mediated metastasis, and an intermediate state between them. We deduced that primo vessels may be precursors of blood vessels. These results possibly provided a thoroughly new theoretic development in cancer metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vascular vessel-mediated metastasis. (a) In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, metastatic tumors showed orange color and blood vessels were observed (black arrows). (b) Under the LZ12 microscope, metastatic tumor expressed bright GFP fluorescence and vascular vessels were obvious (yellow arrows). (c) Microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors were observed. H&E staining revealed blood vessels in the stalk (d) and metastatic tumors (e).
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fig5: Vascular vessel-mediated metastasis. (a) In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, metastatic tumors showed orange color and blood vessels were observed (black arrows). (b) Under the LZ12 microscope, metastatic tumor expressed bright GFP fluorescence and vascular vessels were obvious (yellow arrows). (c) Microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors were observed. H&E staining revealed blood vessels in the stalk (d) and metastatic tumors (e).

Mentions: Compared with metastasis mediated by vascular vessels, we observed an interesting phenomenon that the brightness of GFP-tagged metastatic tumors was much different between primo vessel-mediated metastasis and vascular vessel-mediated ones. In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, tumors appeared yellow color (Figure 5(a)) and expressed much brighter GFP fluorescence (Figure 5(b)) while primo vessel-mediated metastatic tumors showed whiter color (Figure 2(a)) but weaker GFP signal (Figure 3(b)). In high magnified images, microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors also were observed (Figure 5(c)). H&E staining confirmed vascular vessels in the stalks and metastatic tumors in vascular vessel-mediated metastasis (Figures 5(d) and 5(e)). Interestingly, intermediate metastatic tumors between these two states were detected. As shown in Figure 6, half of the tumor showed white color and the other part showed orange color. Because the cancer cells employed in our experiment were transfected by GFP plasmids, we deduced that the different color indicated different amount of cancer cells in metastasis tumors. Further fluorescence detection revealed the different GFP signals between these two parts (Figure 6(d)).


Primo Vascular System: An Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Potential Transitional Tissue Involved in Gastric Cancer Metastasis.

Ping A, Zhendong S, Rongmei Q, Jingxing D, Wei C, Zhongyin Z, Hesheng L, Soh KS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Vascular vessel-mediated metastasis. (a) In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, metastatic tumors showed orange color and blood vessels were observed (black arrows). (b) Under the LZ12 microscope, metastatic tumor expressed bright GFP fluorescence and vascular vessels were obvious (yellow arrows). (c) Microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors were observed. H&E staining revealed blood vessels in the stalk (d) and metastatic tumors (e).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562087&req=5

fig5: Vascular vessel-mediated metastasis. (a) In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, metastatic tumors showed orange color and blood vessels were observed (black arrows). (b) Under the LZ12 microscope, metastatic tumor expressed bright GFP fluorescence and vascular vessels were obvious (yellow arrows). (c) Microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors were observed. H&E staining revealed blood vessels in the stalk (d) and metastatic tumors (e).
Mentions: Compared with metastasis mediated by vascular vessels, we observed an interesting phenomenon that the brightness of GFP-tagged metastatic tumors was much different between primo vessel-mediated metastasis and vascular vessel-mediated ones. In vascular vessel-mediated metastasis, tumors appeared yellow color (Figure 5(a)) and expressed much brighter GFP fluorescence (Figure 5(b)) while primo vessel-mediated metastatic tumors showed whiter color (Figure 2(a)) but weaker GFP signal (Figure 3(b)). In high magnified images, microtumors in the stalk of metastatic tumors also were observed (Figure 5(c)). H&E staining confirmed vascular vessels in the stalks and metastatic tumors in vascular vessel-mediated metastasis (Figures 5(d) and 5(e)). Interestingly, intermediate metastatic tumors between these two states were detected. As shown in Figure 6, half of the tumor showed white color and the other part showed orange color. Because the cancer cells employed in our experiment were transfected by GFP plasmids, we deduced that the different color indicated different amount of cancer cells in metastasis tumors. Further fluorescence detection revealed the different GFP signals between these two parts (Figure 6(d)).

Bottom Line: We observed blood vessel-mediated metastasis, primo vessel-mediated metastasis, and an intermediate state between them.We deduced that primo vessels may be precursors of blood vessels.These results possibly provided a thoroughly new theoretic development in cancer metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
Gastric cancer is the fourth commonest cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Investigation of gastric cancer metastasis is one of the hottest and major focuses in cancer research. Growing evidence manifested that primo vascular system (PVS) is a new kind of circulatory system beyond vascular and lymphatic system. Previous researches revealed that PVS is a specific tissue between endothelium and mesenchyme and is involved in cancer, especially in tumor metastasis and regeneration. In current study, we investigated the role of primo vessels in gastric cancer metastasis and its possible relationship to vascular vessels formation. Our results indicated that primo vessels were involved in gastric cancer metastasis. We observed blood vessel-mediated metastasis, primo vessel-mediated metastasis, and an intermediate state between them. We deduced that primo vessels may be precursors of blood vessels. These results possibly provided a thoroughly new theoretic development in cancer metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus