Limits...
Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development.

Hernandez-Gomez MC, Runavot JL, Guo X, Bourot S, Benians TA, Willats WG, Meulewaeter F, Knox JP - Plant Cell Physiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the transition phase and during secondary cell wall deposition, and localized in both the primary and the secondary cell walls of the cotton fiber.These developmental dynamics were supported by transcript profiling of biosynthetic genes.Whereas our data suggest a role for heteromannan in fiber elongation, heteroxylan is likely to be involved in the regulation of cellulose deposition of secondary cell walls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK These authors contributed equally to this work.

No MeSH data available.


Difference in cotton fiber cell wall thickness. (A) Measurements of cell wall thickness of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers from all lines (PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15). Error bars: SD (n ≥25). Asterisk: Student t-test P-value <0.001 compared with FM966. (B) Representative Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 25 dpa and mature fibers from FM966 and JFW15.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562070&req=5

pcv101-F4: Difference in cotton fiber cell wall thickness. (A) Measurements of cell wall thickness of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers from all lines (PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15). Error bars: SD (n ≥25). Asterisk: Student t-test P-value <0.001 compared with FM966. (B) Representative Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 25 dpa and mature fibers from FM966 and JFW15.

Mentions: For a more extensive analysis of the cotton lines studied here, we compared the mechanical properties of the mature fibers (Table 1). Among all the studied lines, JFW15 had the largest differences in mechanical fiber properties and suitability for textile processing when compared with the commercial FiberMax®-FM966. JFW15 produces a non-spinnable fiber that has poor fiber length (16.4 vs. 28.8 mm) and strength (20 vs. 35 g tex–1) with low uniformity (72% vs. 85%) and very high micronaire (7.7 vs. 4.2). This micronaire value is obtained by measuring the resistance to an airflow and depends on the fiber fineness and degree of maturation (Montalvo 2005, Montalvo et al. 2006). Breeders and cotton manufacturers select fibers with a micronaire between 3.8 and 4.5, as fibers that do not fall in this range cause problems for spinning and dyeing. To corroborate this higher degree of maturation of the JFW15 line, we measured the cell wall thickness in Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers of PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15 (Fig. 4). Striking differences were found in the thickness of the JFW15 (G. arboreum) cell walls compared with those of FM966 (G. hirsutum). At 17 dpa, cell walls of JFW15 fibers are thicker (1.1 µm) than in FM966 (0.3 µm) and the secondary cell wall of JFW15 at 25 dpa (5 µm) is thicker than that of mature FM966 fibers. Cell walls of mature JFW15 fibers appeared four times thicker (8 µm) than in FM966 (2 µm). These data indicate that JFW15 produces an extra-thickened secondary cell wall the synthesis of which starts at an earlier day post-anthesis than in the other lines, as JFW15 fiber cell walls at 17 dpa are significantly thicker compared with FM966. The extra-thick cell walls of JFW15 are associated with this line having shorter, weaker fibers.Fig. 4


Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development.

Hernandez-Gomez MC, Runavot JL, Guo X, Bourot S, Benians TA, Willats WG, Meulewaeter F, Knox JP - Plant Cell Physiol. (2015)

Difference in cotton fiber cell wall thickness. (A) Measurements of cell wall thickness of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers from all lines (PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15). Error bars: SD (n ≥25). Asterisk: Student t-test P-value <0.001 compared with FM966. (B) Representative Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 25 dpa and mature fibers from FM966 and JFW15.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562070&req=5

pcv101-F4: Difference in cotton fiber cell wall thickness. (A) Measurements of cell wall thickness of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers from all lines (PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15). Error bars: SD (n ≥25). Asterisk: Student t-test P-value <0.001 compared with FM966. (B) Representative Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 25 dpa and mature fibers from FM966 and JFW15.
Mentions: For a more extensive analysis of the cotton lines studied here, we compared the mechanical properties of the mature fibers (Table 1). Among all the studied lines, JFW15 had the largest differences in mechanical fiber properties and suitability for textile processing when compared with the commercial FiberMax®-FM966. JFW15 produces a non-spinnable fiber that has poor fiber length (16.4 vs. 28.8 mm) and strength (20 vs. 35 g tex–1) with low uniformity (72% vs. 85%) and very high micronaire (7.7 vs. 4.2). This micronaire value is obtained by measuring the resistance to an airflow and depends on the fiber fineness and degree of maturation (Montalvo 2005, Montalvo et al. 2006). Breeders and cotton manufacturers select fibers with a micronaire between 3.8 and 4.5, as fibers that do not fall in this range cause problems for spinning and dyeing. To corroborate this higher degree of maturation of the JFW15 line, we measured the cell wall thickness in Calcofluor White-stained cross-sections of 10, 17, 25 dpa and mature fibers of PimaS7, FM966, Krasnyj and JFW15 (Fig. 4). Striking differences were found in the thickness of the JFW15 (G. arboreum) cell walls compared with those of FM966 (G. hirsutum). At 17 dpa, cell walls of JFW15 fibers are thicker (1.1 µm) than in FM966 (0.3 µm) and the secondary cell wall of JFW15 at 25 dpa (5 µm) is thicker than that of mature FM966 fibers. Cell walls of mature JFW15 fibers appeared four times thicker (8 µm) than in FM966 (2 µm). These data indicate that JFW15 produces an extra-thickened secondary cell wall the synthesis of which starts at an earlier day post-anthesis than in the other lines, as JFW15 fiber cell walls at 17 dpa are significantly thicker compared with FM966. The extra-thick cell walls of JFW15 are associated with this line having shorter, weaker fibers.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the transition phase and during secondary cell wall deposition, and localized in both the primary and the secondary cell walls of the cotton fiber.These developmental dynamics were supported by transcript profiling of biosynthetic genes.Whereas our data suggest a role for heteromannan in fiber elongation, heteroxylan is likely to be involved in the regulation of cellulose deposition of secondary cell walls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK These authors contributed equally to this work.

No MeSH data available.