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Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development.

Hernandez-Gomez MC, Runavot JL, Guo X, Bourot S, Benians TA, Willats WG, Meulewaeter F, Knox JP - Plant Cell Physiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the transition phase and during secondary cell wall deposition, and localized in both the primary and the secondary cell walls of the cotton fiber.These developmental dynamics were supported by transcript profiling of biosynthetic genes.Whereas our data suggest a role for heteromannan in fiber elongation, heteroxylan is likely to be involved in the regulation of cellulose deposition of secondary cell walls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK These authors contributed equally to this work.

No MeSH data available.


Monosaccharide composition and linkage analysis of cotton fiber polysaccharides during development of FM966 (G. hirsutum). (A) Monosaccharide composition of extracted polysaccharides from FM966 fibers during development. (B) Quantification of selected sugar linkages indicating xylan, mannan and cellulose polysaccharides from a total sugar linkage analysis of FM966 cotton fibers during development. Error bars: SD (n = 6).
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pcv101-F2: Monosaccharide composition and linkage analysis of cotton fiber polysaccharides during development of FM966 (G. hirsutum). (A) Monosaccharide composition of extracted polysaccharides from FM966 fibers during development. (B) Quantification of selected sugar linkages indicating xylan, mannan and cellulose polysaccharides from a total sugar linkage analysis of FM966 cotton fibers during development. Error bars: SD (n = 6).

Mentions: To corroborate the presence and relative abundance of heteromannan and heteroxylan polysaccharides in the cotton fiber, the same fiber samples were analyzed for monosaccharide composition and polysaccharide linkages. The data for FM966 (G. hirsutum) are shown in Fig. 2, but the same monosaccharides and linkages were found in all cotton species (Supplementary Figs. S2, S3). The analysis of the alditol acetates by gas chromatography (GC) showed glucose as the major monosaccharide (Fig. 2A), doubling its amount from 8 dpa (9.2 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) to 17 dpa (18.8 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber). It also confirmed the presence of mannose (up to 0.43 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) and xylose (up to 0.78 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) in FM966 (G. hirsutum) fibers. The amount of mannose and xylose per mg of extracted fiber did not vary significantly during the early stages of fiber development up to 17 dpa. This is in contrast to arabinose that shows a decrease prior to 17 dpa. From 17 to 25 dpa, both mannose and xylose levels decreased and remained stable at very low levels subsequently. A similar pattern was observed for the other non-glucose monosaccharides. Additional evidence of the presence of mannan and xylan glycans in the cell wall was obtained by linkage analysis (Fig. 2B). As expected, the most abundantly detected linkage was the 1,4-glucosyl linkage that increased from 60 mol% at 8 dpa to 97 mol% at 25 dpa. Both mannan backbone- and xylan backbone-specific sugar linkages (1,4-linked mannose and 1,4-linked xylose, respectively) were detected at low levels in fiber cell walls. At 8 dpa, the mannan backbone linkage accounted for 1.1 mol% of the total extracted linkages, and the xylan backbone linkage for 3 mol%. The relative amount of these two linkages decreased as fiber development continued, and detection was negligible after 20 dpa. These data confirm the presence of both heteromannan and heteroxylan in cotton fibers.Fig. 2


Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development.

Hernandez-Gomez MC, Runavot JL, Guo X, Bourot S, Benians TA, Willats WG, Meulewaeter F, Knox JP - Plant Cell Physiol. (2015)

Monosaccharide composition and linkage analysis of cotton fiber polysaccharides during development of FM966 (G. hirsutum). (A) Monosaccharide composition of extracted polysaccharides from FM966 fibers during development. (B) Quantification of selected sugar linkages indicating xylan, mannan and cellulose polysaccharides from a total sugar linkage analysis of FM966 cotton fibers during development. Error bars: SD (n = 6).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562070&req=5

pcv101-F2: Monosaccharide composition and linkage analysis of cotton fiber polysaccharides during development of FM966 (G. hirsutum). (A) Monosaccharide composition of extracted polysaccharides from FM966 fibers during development. (B) Quantification of selected sugar linkages indicating xylan, mannan and cellulose polysaccharides from a total sugar linkage analysis of FM966 cotton fibers during development. Error bars: SD (n = 6).
Mentions: To corroborate the presence and relative abundance of heteromannan and heteroxylan polysaccharides in the cotton fiber, the same fiber samples were analyzed for monosaccharide composition and polysaccharide linkages. The data for FM966 (G. hirsutum) are shown in Fig. 2, but the same monosaccharides and linkages were found in all cotton species (Supplementary Figs. S2, S3). The analysis of the alditol acetates by gas chromatography (GC) showed glucose as the major monosaccharide (Fig. 2A), doubling its amount from 8 dpa (9.2 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) to 17 dpa (18.8 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber). It also confirmed the presence of mannose (up to 0.43 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) and xylose (up to 0.78 mg 100 mg–1 of fiber) in FM966 (G. hirsutum) fibers. The amount of mannose and xylose per mg of extracted fiber did not vary significantly during the early stages of fiber development up to 17 dpa. This is in contrast to arabinose that shows a decrease prior to 17 dpa. From 17 to 25 dpa, both mannose and xylose levels decreased and remained stable at very low levels subsequently. A similar pattern was observed for the other non-glucose monosaccharides. Additional evidence of the presence of mannan and xylan glycans in the cell wall was obtained by linkage analysis (Fig. 2B). As expected, the most abundantly detected linkage was the 1,4-glucosyl linkage that increased from 60 mol% at 8 dpa to 97 mol% at 25 dpa. Both mannan backbone- and xylan backbone-specific sugar linkages (1,4-linked mannose and 1,4-linked xylose, respectively) were detected at low levels in fiber cell walls. At 8 dpa, the mannan backbone linkage accounted for 1.1 mol% of the total extracted linkages, and the xylan backbone linkage for 3 mol%. The relative amount of these two linkages decreased as fiber development continued, and detection was negligible after 20 dpa. These data confirm the presence of both heteromannan and heteroxylan in cotton fibers.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the transition phase and during secondary cell wall deposition, and localized in both the primary and the secondary cell walls of the cotton fiber.These developmental dynamics were supported by transcript profiling of biosynthetic genes.Whereas our data suggest a role for heteromannan in fiber elongation, heteroxylan is likely to be involved in the regulation of cellulose deposition of secondary cell walls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK These authors contributed equally to this work.

No MeSH data available.