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Male rhesus macaques use vocalizations to distinguish female maternal, but not paternal, kin from non-kin.

Pfefferle D, Ruiz-Lambides AV, Widdig A - Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. (Print) (2015)

Bottom Line: Given that dispersal is costly, the dispersing sex may benefit from migrating together with their kin or into groups containing kin.Specifically, males were more likely to respond to close kin compared to more distant kin or unrelated females, with this effect being significant in the maternal, but not paternal kin-line.We discuss that the probability of response might be affected by the potential benefit of the social partner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany ; Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Institute of Biology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany ; Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany ; Leibniz-Science Campus Primate Cognition, German Primate Center and Georg-August-University, Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Recognizing close kin and adjusting one's behavior accordingly (i.e., favor kin in social interactions, but avoid mating with them) would be an important skill that can increase an animals' inclusive fitness. Previous studies showed that philopatric female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) bias their social behavior toward maternal and paternal kin. Benefits gained from selecting kin should, however, not only apply to the philopatric sex, for which the enduring spatial proximity facilitates kin discrimination. Given that dispersal is costly, the dispersing sex may benefit from migrating together with their kin or into groups containing kin. In male rhesus macaques, natal migrants bias their spatial proximity toward familiar male kin rather than familiar non-kin. Here, we set up playback experiments to test if males use the acoustic modality to discriminate familiar female kin from non-kin in a non-sexual context. Males responded differently to the presentation of "coo" calls of related and unrelated females, with their reaction depending on the interaction between kin-line (maternal vs paternal kin) and degree of relatedness (r = 0.5, 0.25). Specifically, males were more likely to respond to close kin compared to more distant kin or unrelated females, with this effect being significant in the maternal, but not paternal kin-line. The present study adds to our knowledge of kin recognition abilities of the dispersing sex, suggesting that male rhesus macaques are also able to identify kin using the acoustic modality. We discuss that the probability of response might be affected by the potential benefit of the social partner.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of males that responded to the presentation of “coo” calls from females with different relatedness to them. In the maternal condition (gray bars), we presented unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs maternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or mothers (r = 0.5). Likewise, in the paternal condition (white bars), unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs paternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or daughters (r = 0.5) were presented. Dashed and solid lines represent the model estimates for male responses toward the different degrees of relatedness within the maternal and paternal kin-line, respectively
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Fig1: Percentage of males that responded to the presentation of “coo” calls from females with different relatedness to them. In the maternal condition (gray bars), we presented unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs maternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or mothers (r = 0.5). Likewise, in the paternal condition (white bars), unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs paternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or daughters (r = 0.5) were presented. Dashed and solid lines represent the model estimates for male responses toward the different degrees of relatedness within the maternal and paternal kin-line, respectively

Mentions: A comparison of the full vs the model revealed that overall, the two predictor variables (degree of relatedness and kin-line) influenced the probability that a male looked toward the broadcasted call (LRT: χ2 = 21.389, df = 1, p < 0.001). There was a significant interaction between kin-line and the degree of relatedness (LRT: χ2 = 5.545, df = 1, p = 0.019, Table 2, Fig. 1), indicating that the effect of the degree of relatedness differs between kin-lines. Specifically, an increase in the degree of relatedness led to a higher probability of male response within the maternal kin-line (post hoc GLMM: Z = 2.508, p = 0.012, Fig. 1), but not the paternal kin-line (post hoc GLMM, Z = 0.770, p = 0.427, Fig. 1). In no case did the order in which the calls were presented influence the males’ response (p > 0.05).Table 2


Male rhesus macaques use vocalizations to distinguish female maternal, but not paternal, kin from non-kin.

Pfefferle D, Ruiz-Lambides AV, Widdig A - Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. (Print) (2015)

Percentage of males that responded to the presentation of “coo” calls from females with different relatedness to them. In the maternal condition (gray bars), we presented unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs maternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or mothers (r = 0.5). Likewise, in the paternal condition (white bars), unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs paternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or daughters (r = 0.5) were presented. Dashed and solid lines represent the model estimates for male responses toward the different degrees of relatedness within the maternal and paternal kin-line, respectively
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Percentage of males that responded to the presentation of “coo” calls from females with different relatedness to them. In the maternal condition (gray bars), we presented unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs maternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or mothers (r = 0.5). Likewise, in the paternal condition (white bars), unrelated individuals (r ≤ 0.063) vs paternal half-sisters (r = 0.25) or daughters (r = 0.5) were presented. Dashed and solid lines represent the model estimates for male responses toward the different degrees of relatedness within the maternal and paternal kin-line, respectively
Mentions: A comparison of the full vs the model revealed that overall, the two predictor variables (degree of relatedness and kin-line) influenced the probability that a male looked toward the broadcasted call (LRT: χ2 = 21.389, df = 1, p < 0.001). There was a significant interaction between kin-line and the degree of relatedness (LRT: χ2 = 5.545, df = 1, p = 0.019, Table 2, Fig. 1), indicating that the effect of the degree of relatedness differs between kin-lines. Specifically, an increase in the degree of relatedness led to a higher probability of male response within the maternal kin-line (post hoc GLMM: Z = 2.508, p = 0.012, Fig. 1), but not the paternal kin-line (post hoc GLMM, Z = 0.770, p = 0.427, Fig. 1). In no case did the order in which the calls were presented influence the males’ response (p > 0.05).Table 2

Bottom Line: Given that dispersal is costly, the dispersing sex may benefit from migrating together with their kin or into groups containing kin.Specifically, males were more likely to respond to close kin compared to more distant kin or unrelated females, with this effect being significant in the maternal, but not paternal kin-line.We discuss that the probability of response might be affected by the potential benefit of the social partner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany ; Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Institute of Biology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany ; Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany ; Leibniz-Science Campus Primate Cognition, German Primate Center and Georg-August-University, Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Recognizing close kin and adjusting one's behavior accordingly (i.e., favor kin in social interactions, but avoid mating with them) would be an important skill that can increase an animals' inclusive fitness. Previous studies showed that philopatric female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) bias their social behavior toward maternal and paternal kin. Benefits gained from selecting kin should, however, not only apply to the philopatric sex, for which the enduring spatial proximity facilitates kin discrimination. Given that dispersal is costly, the dispersing sex may benefit from migrating together with their kin or into groups containing kin. In male rhesus macaques, natal migrants bias their spatial proximity toward familiar male kin rather than familiar non-kin. Here, we set up playback experiments to test if males use the acoustic modality to discriminate familiar female kin from non-kin in a non-sexual context. Males responded differently to the presentation of "coo" calls of related and unrelated females, with their reaction depending on the interaction between kin-line (maternal vs paternal kin) and degree of relatedness (r = 0.5, 0.25). Specifically, males were more likely to respond to close kin compared to more distant kin or unrelated females, with this effect being significant in the maternal, but not paternal kin-line. The present study adds to our knowledge of kin recognition abilities of the dispersing sex, suggesting that male rhesus macaques are also able to identify kin using the acoustic modality. We discuss that the probability of response might be affected by the potential benefit of the social partner.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus