Limits...
Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion.

Miranda H, Gore RJ, Boyer J, Nobrega S, Punnett L - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers.Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides.Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work Environment & Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace (CPH-NEW), University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA ; School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors.

Methods: A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity.

Results: Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity.

Conclusions: Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overweight or obesity among U.S. nursing home employees, as a function of number of workplace stressors in the current job, for all participants and by age group: prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each level above 0 stressors and P value for test of linear trend. Index = sum of workplace stressors: poor coworker support, low decision latitude, recent assault(s) at work, work at night, and lifting heavy loads. Models adjusted for gender, education, and region; adjusted for age only in model of all workers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561990&req=5

fig1: Overweight or obesity among U.S. nursing home employees, as a function of number of workplace stressors in the current job, for all participants and by age group: prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each level above 0 stressors and P value for test of linear trend. Index = sum of workplace stressors: poor coworker support, low decision latitude, recent assault(s) at work, work at night, and lifting heavy loads. Models adjusted for gender, education, and region; adjusted for age only in model of all workers.

Mentions: The risk of obesity was linearly associated in multivariable modeling with the sum of these occupational features: low decision latitude, low coworker support, lifting heavy loads, night work, and recent physical assault. Twelve percent were not exposed to any of these stressors, whereas 27% were exposed to three or more and 8% to all five. The prevalence ratio was 1.8 for workers exposed to four or five stressors, compared to none; among nursing aides alone the PR was 2.0. Age strongly modified the risks, which were higher for younger workers (Figure 1).


Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion.

Miranda H, Gore RJ, Boyer J, Nobrega S, Punnett L - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Overweight or obesity among U.S. nursing home employees, as a function of number of workplace stressors in the current job, for all participants and by age group: prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each level above 0 stressors and P value for test of linear trend. Index = sum of workplace stressors: poor coworker support, low decision latitude, recent assault(s) at work, work at night, and lifting heavy loads. Models adjusted for gender, education, and region; adjusted for age only in model of all workers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561990&req=5

fig1: Overweight or obesity among U.S. nursing home employees, as a function of number of workplace stressors in the current job, for all participants and by age group: prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each level above 0 stressors and P value for test of linear trend. Index = sum of workplace stressors: poor coworker support, low decision latitude, recent assault(s) at work, work at night, and lifting heavy loads. Models adjusted for gender, education, and region; adjusted for age only in model of all workers.
Mentions: The risk of obesity was linearly associated in multivariable modeling with the sum of these occupational features: low decision latitude, low coworker support, lifting heavy loads, night work, and recent physical assault. Twelve percent were not exposed to any of these stressors, whereas 27% were exposed to three or more and 8% to all five. The prevalence ratio was 1.8 for workers exposed to four or five stressors, compared to none; among nursing aides alone the PR was 2.0. Age strongly modified the risks, which were higher for younger workers (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers.Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides.Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work Environment & Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace (CPH-NEW), University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA ; School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors.

Methods: A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity.

Results: Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity.

Conclusions: Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus