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Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework.

Brand SL, Fleming LE, Wyatt KM - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another.This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains.We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth PL6 8BX, UK.

ABSTRACT
Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics) that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

No MeSH data available.


The Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework developed from the principles of complex adaptive system theory guides exploration of eight interrelated workplace characteristics contributing to the ability of a workplace system to self-organise into more health-promoting patterns of behavior.
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fig1: The Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework developed from the principles of complex adaptive system theory guides exploration of eight interrelated workplace characteristics contributing to the ability of a workplace system to self-organise into more health-promoting patterns of behavior.

Mentions: From the complex adaptive system principles described in Table 1, we identified eight interrelated domains that may impact on a workplace's ability to self-organise into new patterns of behaviour over time. The eight domains are aspects of the workplace that should be considered when seeking to understand the unique nature of a particular workplace to aid setting-appropriate and setting-sensitive intervention development. The WoW framework guides the understanding of aspects of the interrelated context, culture, and dynamic nature of the local setting that enables or blocks the dynamical ability of the system to self-organise into new patterns of behaviour. The eight interrelated domains in the Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework are illustrated in Figure 1.


Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework.

Brand SL, Fleming LE, Wyatt KM - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

The Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework developed from the principles of complex adaptive system theory guides exploration of eight interrelated workplace characteristics contributing to the ability of a workplace system to self-organise into more health-promoting patterns of behavior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561988&req=5

fig1: The Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework developed from the principles of complex adaptive system theory guides exploration of eight interrelated workplace characteristics contributing to the ability of a workplace system to self-organise into more health-promoting patterns of behavior.
Mentions: From the complex adaptive system principles described in Table 1, we identified eight interrelated domains that may impact on a workplace's ability to self-organise into new patterns of behaviour over time. The eight domains are aspects of the workplace that should be considered when seeking to understand the unique nature of a particular workplace to aid setting-appropriate and setting-sensitive intervention development. The WoW framework guides the understanding of aspects of the interrelated context, culture, and dynamic nature of the local setting that enables or blocks the dynamical ability of the system to self-organise into new patterns of behaviour. The eight interrelated domains in the Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework are illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another.This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains.We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth PL6 8BX, UK.

ABSTRACT
Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics) that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

No MeSH data available.