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Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

Köhler CA, Carvalho AF, Alves GS, McIntyre RS, Hyphantis TN, Cammarota M - Neural Plast. (2015)

Bottom Line: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories.Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals.We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Memory Research Laboratory, Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), 59056-450 Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The CaR-FA-X model. Three factors (CApture/Rumination, Functional Avoidance, and impaired eXecutive function and control) interact to decrease the specificity of retrieved autobiographical memories. These less specific memories and the three factors per se can then have effects on cognition and behavior.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The CaR-FA-X model. Three factors (CApture/Rumination, Functional Avoidance, and impaired eXecutive function and control) interact to decrease the specificity of retrieved autobiographical memories. These less specific memories and the three factors per se can then have effects on cognition and behavior.

Mentions: The CaR-FA-X model (Figure 1) proposed by Williams and colleagues [42] conceptualizes the core mechanisms related to reduced autobiographical memory specificity in depression. This model postulates that difficulties accessing specific autobiographical memories result from the capture (Ca) of memory search efforts by consolidated categorical depressogenic themes, which then engage analytical, evaluative ruminative (R) processes referred to as brooding [57]. Such capture mechanisms are exacerbated by ingrained functional avoidance (FA) of specific details of distressing autobiographical events, which in turn leads to the processing of an autobiographical representation at the categorical level. The ability to counteract these dysfunctional processing mechanisms is compromised as a function of the limited executive (X) control, which is a consistent feature present in individuals with depression even in remitted states [58, 59].


Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

Köhler CA, Carvalho AF, Alves GS, McIntyre RS, Hyphantis TN, Cammarota M - Neural Plast. (2015)

The CaR-FA-X model. Three factors (CApture/Rumination, Functional Avoidance, and impaired eXecutive function and control) interact to decrease the specificity of retrieved autobiographical memories. These less specific memories and the three factors per se can then have effects on cognition and behavior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561987&req=5

fig1: The CaR-FA-X model. Three factors (CApture/Rumination, Functional Avoidance, and impaired eXecutive function and control) interact to decrease the specificity of retrieved autobiographical memories. These less specific memories and the three factors per se can then have effects on cognition and behavior.
Mentions: The CaR-FA-X model (Figure 1) proposed by Williams and colleagues [42] conceptualizes the core mechanisms related to reduced autobiographical memory specificity in depression. This model postulates that difficulties accessing specific autobiographical memories result from the capture (Ca) of memory search efforts by consolidated categorical depressogenic themes, which then engage analytical, evaluative ruminative (R) processes referred to as brooding [57]. Such capture mechanisms are exacerbated by ingrained functional avoidance (FA) of specific details of distressing autobiographical events, which in turn leads to the processing of an autobiographical representation at the categorical level. The ability to counteract these dysfunctional processing mechanisms is compromised as a function of the limited executive (X) control, which is a consistent feature present in individuals with depression even in remitted states [58, 59].

Bottom Line: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories.Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals.We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Memory Research Laboratory, Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), 59056-450 Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus