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Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States.

Lombardo D, Twamley J - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging.In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation.It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane's opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane's position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Depiction of the transfer of entanglement from the cavity modes to an ensemble of atoms.The left and right cavity modes are left/right hand circularly polarised then directed into a cloud of atoms. Two separate transitions are excited depending on the polarisation, shown above.
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f4: Depiction of the transfer of entanglement from the cavity modes to an ensemble of atoms.The left and right cavity modes are left/right hand circularly polarised then directed into a cloud of atoms. Two separate transitions are excited depending on the polarisation, shown above.

Mentions: As the two disentanglement methods discussed above either fail or are currently infeasible an alternative disentanglement protocol for Eq. (13) must now be established. As mentioned above, we proceed by transferring the excitations held in the photonic subsystem to a new discrete atomic ensemble subsystem containing M > N three-level atomic atoms . We achieve this transfer via tagging the photons in the two optical cavities in the MITM system via separate polarizations and using this polarization degree of freedom to excite polarization dependent transitions in the atomic ensemble. Once encoded into the atomic ensemble we describe a relatively simple method to perform the disentanglement we seek by manipulating the internal states of the atomic ensemble. The entanglement transfer can be achieved if the light in the left/right cavities is left/right hand (σL/σR) circularly polarised. By quickly introducing an ensemble of M 3-level atoms into the system the photons in the left/right cavity modes are separately absorbed into the ms = ±1 excited states of the atoms. This process simultaneously removes the photons from both cavities while encoding the state of each cavity into the internal excited states of the ensemble of atoms, see Fig. 4. To explore the mapping of the entanglement to the atomic ensemble the case of a single 3-level atom interacting with the σL/σR polarised photons can be considered. In this case the interaction is described by the Hamiltonian,


Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States.

Lombardo D, Twamley J - Sci Rep (2015)

Depiction of the transfer of entanglement from the cavity modes to an ensemble of atoms.The left and right cavity modes are left/right hand circularly polarised then directed into a cloud of atoms. Two separate transitions are excited depending on the polarisation, shown above.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561959&req=5

f4: Depiction of the transfer of entanglement from the cavity modes to an ensemble of atoms.The left and right cavity modes are left/right hand circularly polarised then directed into a cloud of atoms. Two separate transitions are excited depending on the polarisation, shown above.
Mentions: As the two disentanglement methods discussed above either fail or are currently infeasible an alternative disentanglement protocol for Eq. (13) must now be established. As mentioned above, we proceed by transferring the excitations held in the photonic subsystem to a new discrete atomic ensemble subsystem containing M > N three-level atomic atoms . We achieve this transfer via tagging the photons in the two optical cavities in the MITM system via separate polarizations and using this polarization degree of freedom to excite polarization dependent transitions in the atomic ensemble. Once encoded into the atomic ensemble we describe a relatively simple method to perform the disentanglement we seek by manipulating the internal states of the atomic ensemble. The entanglement transfer can be achieved if the light in the left/right cavities is left/right hand (σL/σR) circularly polarised. By quickly introducing an ensemble of M 3-level atoms into the system the photons in the left/right cavity modes are separately absorbed into the ms = ±1 excited states of the atoms. This process simultaneously removes the photons from both cavities while encoding the state of each cavity into the internal excited states of the ensemble of atoms, see Fig. 4. To explore the mapping of the entanglement to the atomic ensemble the case of a single 3-level atom interacting with the σL/σR polarised photons can be considered. In this case the interaction is described by the Hamiltonian,

Bottom Line: Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging.In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation.It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane's opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane's position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus