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Using Photovoice as a Community Based Participatory Research Tool for Changing Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Behaviours in Usoma, Kenya.

Bisung E, Elliott SJ, Abudho B, Karanja DM, Schuster-Wallace CJ - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Between June and August 2013, photovoice was conducted with eight (8) women in Usoma, a lakeshore community in Western Kenya with a follow-up community meeting (baraza) in May 2014 to discuss findings with the community members and government officials.In the first part of the study, photovoice one-on-one interviews were used to explore local perceptions and practices around water-health linkages and how the ecological and socio-political environment shapes these perceptions and practices.This paper, which is the second component of the study, uses photovoice group discussions to explore participants' experiences with and (re)action to the photographs and the photovoice project.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 ; United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UN-INWEH), Hamilton, ON, Canada L8P 0A1.

ABSTRACT
Recent years have witnessed an increase in the use of community based participatory research (CBPR) tools for understanding environment and health issues and facilitating social action. This paper explores the application and utility of photovoice for understanding water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) behaviours and catalysing community led solutions to change behaviours. Between June and August 2013, photovoice was conducted with eight (8) women in Usoma, a lakeshore community in Western Kenya with a follow-up community meeting (baraza) in May 2014 to discuss findings with the community members and government officials. In the first part of the study, photovoice one-on-one interviews were used to explore local perceptions and practices around water-health linkages and how the ecological and socio-political environment shapes these perceptions and practices. This paper, which is the second component of the study, uses photovoice group discussions to explore participants' experiences with and (re)action to the photographs and the photovoice project. The findings illustrate that photovoice was an effective CBPR methodology for understanding behaviours, creating awareness, facilitating collective action, and engaging with local government and local health officials at the water-health nexus.

No MeSH data available.


Study site: Usoma, Kenya [28].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561937&req=5

fig1: Study site: Usoma, Kenya [28].

Mentions: Usoma is located about 15 km from Kisumu, the third largest city in Kenya. Though located on the shore of Lake Victoria (the second largest freshwater lake in the world), the people had no access to safe water at the time of this study. The nearest safe water source was a tap located 3 km away on the premises of a Coca-Cola bottling plant and was perceived to have high chlorine content and the few wells and boreholes that existed were mostly dried up or contaminated [28]. Thus majority (86%) of the community depends on the lake for their domestic water needs [39]. This has resulted in high incidence of water-borne and other water related diseases. For example, over 90% of school children are found to have schistosomiasis infections [47]. In addition to contamination by human and animal waste, the lake over the years has been contaminated through adverse industrial activities such as dumping of waste and sewerage. With regard to sanitation, a survey conducted indicated that about 42% of households in the community practice open defecation, with pit latrines being the most commonly reported sanitation facility in the community [39]. Over the years, marginalisation of the community (such as inadequate provision of social services by municipal authorities and government agencies) together with unemployment has served as major barriers to improving water and sanitation conditions [27, 28, 48, 49]. Figure 1 shows the locations of Usoma.


Using Photovoice as a Community Based Participatory Research Tool for Changing Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Behaviours in Usoma, Kenya.

Bisung E, Elliott SJ, Abudho B, Karanja DM, Schuster-Wallace CJ - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Study site: Usoma, Kenya [28].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561937&req=5

fig1: Study site: Usoma, Kenya [28].
Mentions: Usoma is located about 15 km from Kisumu, the third largest city in Kenya. Though located on the shore of Lake Victoria (the second largest freshwater lake in the world), the people had no access to safe water at the time of this study. The nearest safe water source was a tap located 3 km away on the premises of a Coca-Cola bottling plant and was perceived to have high chlorine content and the few wells and boreholes that existed were mostly dried up or contaminated [28]. Thus majority (86%) of the community depends on the lake for their domestic water needs [39]. This has resulted in high incidence of water-borne and other water related diseases. For example, over 90% of school children are found to have schistosomiasis infections [47]. In addition to contamination by human and animal waste, the lake over the years has been contaminated through adverse industrial activities such as dumping of waste and sewerage. With regard to sanitation, a survey conducted indicated that about 42% of households in the community practice open defecation, with pit latrines being the most commonly reported sanitation facility in the community [39]. Over the years, marginalisation of the community (such as inadequate provision of social services by municipal authorities and government agencies) together with unemployment has served as major barriers to improving water and sanitation conditions [27, 28, 48, 49]. Figure 1 shows the locations of Usoma.

Bottom Line: Between June and August 2013, photovoice was conducted with eight (8) women in Usoma, a lakeshore community in Western Kenya with a follow-up community meeting (baraza) in May 2014 to discuss findings with the community members and government officials.In the first part of the study, photovoice one-on-one interviews were used to explore local perceptions and practices around water-health linkages and how the ecological and socio-political environment shapes these perceptions and practices.This paper, which is the second component of the study, uses photovoice group discussions to explore participants' experiences with and (re)action to the photographs and the photovoice project.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 ; United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UN-INWEH), Hamilton, ON, Canada L8P 0A1.

ABSTRACT
Recent years have witnessed an increase in the use of community based participatory research (CBPR) tools for understanding environment and health issues and facilitating social action. This paper explores the application and utility of photovoice for understanding water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) behaviours and catalysing community led solutions to change behaviours. Between June and August 2013, photovoice was conducted with eight (8) women in Usoma, a lakeshore community in Western Kenya with a follow-up community meeting (baraza) in May 2014 to discuss findings with the community members and government officials. In the first part of the study, photovoice one-on-one interviews were used to explore local perceptions and practices around water-health linkages and how the ecological and socio-political environment shapes these perceptions and practices. This paper, which is the second component of the study, uses photovoice group discussions to explore participants' experiences with and (re)action to the photographs and the photovoice project. The findings illustrate that photovoice was an effective CBPR methodology for understanding behaviours, creating awareness, facilitating collective action, and engaging with local government and local health officials at the water-health nexus.

No MeSH data available.