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Using mHealth to Improve Usage of Antenatal Care, Postnatal Care, and Immunization: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Watterson JL, Walsh J, Madeka I - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria.The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n = 8) and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n = 8).However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Practice in Maternal and Child Health, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have been implemented in many low- and middle-income countries to address challenges in maternal and child health. Many of these technologies attempt to influence patients', caretakers', or health workers' behavior. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to determine what evidence exists for the effectiveness of mHealth tools to increase the coverage and use of antenatal care (ANC), postnatal care (PNC), and childhood immunizations through behavior change in low- and middle-income countries. The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria. The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n = 8) and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n = 8). All studies showed at least some evidence of effectiveness at changing behavior to improve antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates. However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

No MeSH data available.


PRISMA flow diagram [26].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561933&req=5

fig1: PRISMA flow diagram [26].

Mentions: The results of study screening and selection are illustrated in Figure 1. The database searches identified 1,899 articles initially. After removing duplicates, 508 records remained. Each of these records was screened by title and abstract (if necessary), and 455 records were excluded after this preliminary review. The full text of the remaining 53 articles was reviewed to determine if they met the inclusion criteria. 43 of the articles were excluded and the reasons for exclusion included study being conducted in a high-income country (n = 5); not studying antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates (n = 7); not studying an mHealth intervention (n = 2); or only providing program descriptions or a protocol but no evaluation data (n = 4). The other 25 articles that were excluded were mHealth literature reviews that did not identify any new articles for review. One article outlined a protocol for a study that will be very relevant once complete; however it was nevertheless excluded because no evaluation data is published yet [11].


Using mHealth to Improve Usage of Antenatal Care, Postnatal Care, and Immunization: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Watterson JL, Walsh J, Madeka I - Biomed Res Int (2015)

PRISMA flow diagram [26].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561933&req=5

fig1: PRISMA flow diagram [26].
Mentions: The results of study screening and selection are illustrated in Figure 1. The database searches identified 1,899 articles initially. After removing duplicates, 508 records remained. Each of these records was screened by title and abstract (if necessary), and 455 records were excluded after this preliminary review. The full text of the remaining 53 articles was reviewed to determine if they met the inclusion criteria. 43 of the articles were excluded and the reasons for exclusion included study being conducted in a high-income country (n = 5); not studying antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates (n = 7); not studying an mHealth intervention (n = 2); or only providing program descriptions or a protocol but no evaluation data (n = 4). The other 25 articles that were excluded were mHealth literature reviews that did not identify any new articles for review. One article outlined a protocol for a study that will be very relevant once complete; however it was nevertheless excluded because no evaluation data is published yet [11].

Bottom Line: The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria.The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n = 8) and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n = 8).However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Practice in Maternal and Child Health, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have been implemented in many low- and middle-income countries to address challenges in maternal and child health. Many of these technologies attempt to influence patients', caretakers', or health workers' behavior. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to determine what evidence exists for the effectiveness of mHealth tools to increase the coverage and use of antenatal care (ANC), postnatal care (PNC), and childhood immunizations through behavior change in low- and middle-income countries. The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria. The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n = 8) and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n = 8). All studies showed at least some evidence of effectiveness at changing behavior to improve antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates. However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

No MeSH data available.