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A Data Hiding Technique to Synchronously Embed Physiological Signals in H.264/AVC Encoded Video for Medicine Healthcare.

Peña R, Ávila A, Muñoz D, Lavariega J - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The recognition of clinical manifestations in both video images and physiological-signal waveforms is an important aid to improve the safety and effectiveness in medical care.The experimental results revealed successful embedding and full restoration of signal's samples.Our results also demonstrated a small distortion in the video objective quality, a small increment in bit-rate, and embedded cost savings of -2.6196% for high and medium motion video sequences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tecnológico de Monterrey, 64849 Monterrey, NL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The recognition of clinical manifestations in both video images and physiological-signal waveforms is an important aid to improve the safety and effectiveness in medical care. Physicians can rely on video-waveform (VW) observations to recognize difficult-to-spot signs and symptoms. The VW observations can also reduce the number of false positive incidents and expand the recognition coverage to abnormal health conditions. The synchronization between the video images and the physiological-signal waveforms is fundamental for the successful recognition of the clinical manifestations. The use of conventional equipment to synchronously acquire and display the video-waveform information involves complex tasks such as the video capture/compression, the acquisition/compression of each physiological signal, and the video-waveform synchronization based on timestamps. This paper introduces a data hiding technique capable of both enabling embedding channels and synchronously hiding samples of physiological signals into encoded video sequences. Our data hiding technique offers large data capacity and simplifies the complexity of the video-waveform acquisition and reproduction. The experimental results revealed successful embedding and full restoration of signal's samples. Our results also demonstrated a small distortion in the video objective quality, a small increment in bit-rate, and embedded cost savings of -2.6196% for high and medium motion video sequences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change of bit-rate for seven video test sequences.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig9: Change of bit-rate for seven video test sequences.

Mentions: Embedding the EEG data into the video sequences produced increments of bit-rate for the seven video test sequences as illustrated in Figure 9. Our experimental setup included high motion, medium motion, and low motion video test sequences. The amount motion of the neonatal video sequence was considered between medium and low. The graph presents the neonatal sequence with gray color to indicate that it is not a standard video test sequence. For the high and medium motion sequences, there are small bit-rate increments. The bit-rate increments ranged from 0.45% to 1.34%. For the neonatal and low motion sequences, the PSKIP block replacement occurred and resulted in bigger bit-rate increments. The bit-rate increments ranged from 5.6% to 36.58%. However, the changes in the bit-rate had no effect on the video-waveform synchronization.


A Data Hiding Technique to Synchronously Embed Physiological Signals in H.264/AVC Encoded Video for Medicine Healthcare.

Peña R, Ávila A, Muñoz D, Lavariega J - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Change of bit-rate for seven video test sequences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561930&req=5

fig9: Change of bit-rate for seven video test sequences.
Mentions: Embedding the EEG data into the video sequences produced increments of bit-rate for the seven video test sequences as illustrated in Figure 9. Our experimental setup included high motion, medium motion, and low motion video test sequences. The amount motion of the neonatal video sequence was considered between medium and low. The graph presents the neonatal sequence with gray color to indicate that it is not a standard video test sequence. For the high and medium motion sequences, there are small bit-rate increments. The bit-rate increments ranged from 0.45% to 1.34%. For the neonatal and low motion sequences, the PSKIP block replacement occurred and resulted in bigger bit-rate increments. The bit-rate increments ranged from 5.6% to 36.58%. However, the changes in the bit-rate had no effect on the video-waveform synchronization.

Bottom Line: The recognition of clinical manifestations in both video images and physiological-signal waveforms is an important aid to improve the safety and effectiveness in medical care.The experimental results revealed successful embedding and full restoration of signal's samples.Our results also demonstrated a small distortion in the video objective quality, a small increment in bit-rate, and embedded cost savings of -2.6196% for high and medium motion video sequences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tecnológico de Monterrey, 64849 Monterrey, NL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The recognition of clinical manifestations in both video images and physiological-signal waveforms is an important aid to improve the safety and effectiveness in medical care. Physicians can rely on video-waveform (VW) observations to recognize difficult-to-spot signs and symptoms. The VW observations can also reduce the number of false positive incidents and expand the recognition coverage to abnormal health conditions. The synchronization between the video images and the physiological-signal waveforms is fundamental for the successful recognition of the clinical manifestations. The use of conventional equipment to synchronously acquire and display the video-waveform information involves complex tasks such as the video capture/compression, the acquisition/compression of each physiological signal, and the video-waveform synchronization based on timestamps. This paper introduces a data hiding technique capable of both enabling embedding channels and synchronously hiding samples of physiological signals into encoded video sequences. Our data hiding technique offers large data capacity and simplifies the complexity of the video-waveform acquisition and reproduction. The experimental results revealed successful embedding and full restoration of signal's samples. Our results also demonstrated a small distortion in the video objective quality, a small increment in bit-rate, and embedded cost savings of -2.6196% for high and medium motion video sequences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus