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Single scrotal-incision orchidopexy for palpable undescended testis in children.

Zouari M, Dhaou MB, Jallouli M, Mhiri R - Arab J Urol (2014)

Bottom Line: At 3 months after surgery the overall cosmetic result was excellent.The SSIO is minimal-access surgery allowing less dissection, less discomfort for the patient, rapid healing, excellent cosmetic results and a good success rate.This technique is safe and effective for undescended testes palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hedi Chaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the single scrotal-incision orchidopexy (SSIO) technique in patients with an undescended testis palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

Patients and methods: Between January 2011 and December 2013 we performed 100 SSIOs in 89 patients. The mean (range) follow-up was 9 (3-36) months.

Results: In 88 testes the SSIO was performed with no difficulties. In four patients an additional dissection by opening the external ring and canal was necessary; none of these patients developed an inguinal hernia after surgery. In eight patients conversion to an inguinal approach was necessary because of difficulty in controlling the hernial sacs and inadequate mobilisation. At the follow-up assessment, of the 89 patients, none developed testicular atrophy, one (1%) had wound dehiscence and four (5%) had a scrotal haematoma. There was no statistically significant difference between the testicular size at baseline and that during the follow-up. At 3 months after surgery the overall cosmetic result was excellent.

Conclusion: The SSIO is minimal-access surgery allowing less dissection, less discomfort for the patient, rapid healing, excellent cosmetic results and a good success rate. This technique is safe and effective for undescended testes palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The intraoperative appearance of scrotal orchidopexy in a patient with an inguinal hernia (arrow).
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f0010: The intraoperative appearance of scrotal orchidopexy in a patient with an inguinal hernia (arrow).

Mentions: The principle surgical steps included: A high transverse scrotal incision; creation of a dartos pouch; deepening the incision through the layers of the scrotum down to the testis; releasing the gubernacular attachments to enable identification of the testis within the cremasteric fibres, a patent processus vaginalis, and the cord structures; separating the cremasteric fibres and hernia sac from the cord structures; mobilising the cranial sac under traction; high ligation of the hernia sac at the level of its origin at the internal inguinal ring (Fig. 2); placing the testis into the dartos pouch, and fixing it to the scrotal septum; and closing the scrotal skin with dissolvable sutures.


Single scrotal-incision orchidopexy for palpable undescended testis in children.

Zouari M, Dhaou MB, Jallouli M, Mhiri R - Arab J Urol (2014)

The intraoperative appearance of scrotal orchidopexy in a patient with an inguinal hernia (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561924&req=5

f0010: The intraoperative appearance of scrotal orchidopexy in a patient with an inguinal hernia (arrow).
Mentions: The principle surgical steps included: A high transverse scrotal incision; creation of a dartos pouch; deepening the incision through the layers of the scrotum down to the testis; releasing the gubernacular attachments to enable identification of the testis within the cremasteric fibres, a patent processus vaginalis, and the cord structures; separating the cremasteric fibres and hernia sac from the cord structures; mobilising the cranial sac under traction; high ligation of the hernia sac at the level of its origin at the internal inguinal ring (Fig. 2); placing the testis into the dartos pouch, and fixing it to the scrotal septum; and closing the scrotal skin with dissolvable sutures.

Bottom Line: At 3 months after surgery the overall cosmetic result was excellent.The SSIO is minimal-access surgery allowing less dissection, less discomfort for the patient, rapid healing, excellent cosmetic results and a good success rate.This technique is safe and effective for undescended testes palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hedi Chaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the single scrotal-incision orchidopexy (SSIO) technique in patients with an undescended testis palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

Patients and methods: Between January 2011 and December 2013 we performed 100 SSIOs in 89 patients. The mean (range) follow-up was 9 (3-36) months.

Results: In 88 testes the SSIO was performed with no difficulties. In four patients an additional dissection by opening the external ring and canal was necessary; none of these patients developed an inguinal hernia after surgery. In eight patients conversion to an inguinal approach was necessary because of difficulty in controlling the hernial sacs and inadequate mobilisation. At the follow-up assessment, of the 89 patients, none developed testicular atrophy, one (1%) had wound dehiscence and four (5%) had a scrotal haematoma. There was no statistically significant difference between the testicular size at baseline and that during the follow-up. At 3 months after surgery the overall cosmetic result was excellent.

Conclusion: The SSIO is minimal-access surgery allowing less dissection, less discomfort for the patient, rapid healing, excellent cosmetic results and a good success rate. This technique is safe and effective for undescended testes palpable in the inguinal canal or below the external inguinal ring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus