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Priming effect of (13)C-labelled wheat straw in no-tillage soil under drying and wetting cycles in the Loess Plateau of China.

Liu E, Wang J, Zhang Y, Angers DA, Yan C, Oweis T, He W, Liu Q, Chen B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of (13)C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils.There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE.Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, PR China.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of (13)C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils. We observed that the SOC mineralisation rate in rewetted soils was greater than that in soils that were kept at constant water content. The proportion of CO2 derived from the straw declined dramatically during the first 10 days. The priming direction was first positive, and then became slightly negative. The PE was higher under DW cycles than under constant water content. There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE. The data indicate that the DW cycles had a significant effect on the SOC mineralisation rate and on the PE, demonstrating a positive combined effect between wheat straw and moisture fluctuations. Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sequence of treatment and water content during drying and wetting (DW) cycles.W, D and S represent wetting (4 d), drying (6 d), and sampling (first day after rewetting), respectively, during each DW cycle. One complete DW cycle included 4 d wetting and 6 d air-drying. Field capacity was maintained constant during the 4 d wetting incubations.
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f1: Sequence of treatment and water content during drying and wetting (DW) cycles.W, D and S represent wetting (4 d), drying (6 d), and sampling (first day after rewetting), respectively, during each DW cycle. One complete DW cycle included 4 d wetting and 6 d air-drying. Field capacity was maintained constant during the 4 d wetting incubations.

Mentions: Daily precipitation records for the area from the same period (1991 to 2010) for the area were used to determine the duration of the wetting and drying cycle for the experiment. The data showed that the soils experienced dry conditions 60% of the year, thus a wetting and drying cycle consisted of 6 days of dry conditions and 4 days of wet conditions. Twelve DW cycles were implemented during the experimental period (120 d). The treatments and their combinations were as follows (2 straw treatments × 2 tillage-treated soils × 2 water contents): (i) with or without straw input, (ii) soil from the CT field or NT field and (iii) with or without exposure to DW cycles, which was characterised by wetting at 100% WHC (water-holding capacity,) and air-drying (10–15% WHC) at 25 °C in an incubator with controlled temperature and humidity (Fig. 1).


Priming effect of (13)C-labelled wheat straw in no-tillage soil under drying and wetting cycles in the Loess Plateau of China.

Liu E, Wang J, Zhang Y, Angers DA, Yan C, Oweis T, He W, Liu Q, Chen B - Sci Rep (2015)

Sequence of treatment and water content during drying and wetting (DW) cycles.W, D and S represent wetting (4 d), drying (6 d), and sampling (first day after rewetting), respectively, during each DW cycle. One complete DW cycle included 4 d wetting and 6 d air-drying. Field capacity was maintained constant during the 4 d wetting incubations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561916&req=5

f1: Sequence of treatment and water content during drying and wetting (DW) cycles.W, D and S represent wetting (4 d), drying (6 d), and sampling (first day after rewetting), respectively, during each DW cycle. One complete DW cycle included 4 d wetting and 6 d air-drying. Field capacity was maintained constant during the 4 d wetting incubations.
Mentions: Daily precipitation records for the area from the same period (1991 to 2010) for the area were used to determine the duration of the wetting and drying cycle for the experiment. The data showed that the soils experienced dry conditions 60% of the year, thus a wetting and drying cycle consisted of 6 days of dry conditions and 4 days of wet conditions. Twelve DW cycles were implemented during the experimental period (120 d). The treatments and their combinations were as follows (2 straw treatments × 2 tillage-treated soils × 2 water contents): (i) with or without straw input, (ii) soil from the CT field or NT field and (iii) with or without exposure to DW cycles, which was characterised by wetting at 100% WHC (water-holding capacity,) and air-drying (10–15% WHC) at 25 °C in an incubator with controlled temperature and humidity (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of (13)C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils.There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE.Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, PR China.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of (13)C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils. We observed that the SOC mineralisation rate in rewetted soils was greater than that in soils that were kept at constant water content. The proportion of CO2 derived from the straw declined dramatically during the first 10 days. The priming direction was first positive, and then became slightly negative. The PE was higher under DW cycles than under constant water content. There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE. The data indicate that the DW cycles had a significant effect on the SOC mineralisation rate and on the PE, demonstrating a positive combined effect between wheat straw and moisture fluctuations. Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus