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Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Hafkemeijer A, Möller C, Dopper EG, Jiskoot LC, Schouten TM, van Swieten JC, van der Flier WM, Vrenken H, Pijnenburg YA, Barkhof F, Scheltens P, van der Grond J, Rombouts SA - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus.In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex.Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Methodology and Statistics, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands ; Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center Leiden, Netherlands ; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study functional brain connectivity differences between AD and bvFTD.

Methods: We used resting state fMRI data of 31 AD patients, 25 bvFTD patients, and 29 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. We studied functional connectivity throughout the entire brain, applying two different analysis techniques, studying network-to-region and region-to-region connectivity. A general linear model approach was used to study group differences, while controlling for physiological noise, age, gender, study center, and regional gray matter volume.

Results: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus. In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex. Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus.

Conclusion: We showed that the pathophysiology of functional brain connectivity is different between AD and bvFTD. Our findings support the hypothesis that resting state fMRI shows disease-specific functional connectivity differences and is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD and bvFTD. However, the group differences in functional connectivity are less abundant than has been shown in previous studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Functional connectivity in bvFTD vs. AD: region-to-region connectivity. Differences in pairwise functional connectivity between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). (A) Decreased functional connectivity between right superior temporal gyrus (blue area, coronal slice) and cuneal cortex (yellow), supracalcarine cortex (blue), intracalcarine cortex (pink), and lingual gyrus (green) in bvFTD compared with AD. Images show brain areas based on the probabilistic Harvard-Oxford structural atlas overlaid on coronal and sagittal slices of the MNI-152 standard anatomical image. (B) Subjects' correlation scores were extracted from brain areas with differences in functional connectivity between the two patient groups (right cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus). Boxplots show median, lower, and upper quartile, and sample minimum and maximum correlation scores for patients with AD, patients with bvFTD, and healthy controls (HC, dotted lines).
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Figure 3: Functional connectivity in bvFTD vs. AD: region-to-region connectivity. Differences in pairwise functional connectivity between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). (A) Decreased functional connectivity between right superior temporal gyrus (blue area, coronal slice) and cuneal cortex (yellow), supracalcarine cortex (blue), intracalcarine cortex (pink), and lingual gyrus (green) in bvFTD compared with AD. Images show brain areas based on the probabilistic Harvard-Oxford structural atlas overlaid on coronal and sagittal slices of the MNI-152 standard anatomical image. (B) Subjects' correlation scores were extracted from brain areas with differences in functional connectivity between the two patient groups (right cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus). Boxplots show median, lower, and upper quartile, and sample minimum and maximum correlation scores for patients with AD, patients with bvFTD, and healthy controls (HC, dotted lines).

Mentions: In a second analysis, we studied connections throughout the entire brain using correlation analyses between 110 cortical and subcortical brain areas and found a main effect of group. The results of post-hoc testing showed decreased pairwise connectivity in bvFTD compared with AD between the right superior temporal gyrus (Figure 3A, blue area, coronal slice) and the right cuneal cortex (Figure 3A, yellow, p < 0.0001), left cuneal cortex (p = 0.0002), the right supracalcarine cortex (Figure 3A, blue, p = 0.0002), left supracalcarine cortex (p = 0.0001), the right intracalcarine cortex (Figure 3A, pink, p = 0.0001), and the right lingual gyrus (Figure 3A, green, p = 0.0002).


Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Hafkemeijer A, Möller C, Dopper EG, Jiskoot LC, Schouten TM, van Swieten JC, van der Flier WM, Vrenken H, Pijnenburg YA, Barkhof F, Scheltens P, van der Grond J, Rombouts SA - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Functional connectivity in bvFTD vs. AD: region-to-region connectivity. Differences in pairwise functional connectivity between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). (A) Decreased functional connectivity between right superior temporal gyrus (blue area, coronal slice) and cuneal cortex (yellow), supracalcarine cortex (blue), intracalcarine cortex (pink), and lingual gyrus (green) in bvFTD compared with AD. Images show brain areas based on the probabilistic Harvard-Oxford structural atlas overlaid on coronal and sagittal slices of the MNI-152 standard anatomical image. (B) Subjects' correlation scores were extracted from brain areas with differences in functional connectivity between the two patient groups (right cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus). Boxplots show median, lower, and upper quartile, and sample minimum and maximum correlation scores for patients with AD, patients with bvFTD, and healthy controls (HC, dotted lines).
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Figure 3: Functional connectivity in bvFTD vs. AD: region-to-region connectivity. Differences in pairwise functional connectivity between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). (A) Decreased functional connectivity between right superior temporal gyrus (blue area, coronal slice) and cuneal cortex (yellow), supracalcarine cortex (blue), intracalcarine cortex (pink), and lingual gyrus (green) in bvFTD compared with AD. Images show brain areas based on the probabilistic Harvard-Oxford structural atlas overlaid on coronal and sagittal slices of the MNI-152 standard anatomical image. (B) Subjects' correlation scores were extracted from brain areas with differences in functional connectivity between the two patient groups (right cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus). Boxplots show median, lower, and upper quartile, and sample minimum and maximum correlation scores for patients with AD, patients with bvFTD, and healthy controls (HC, dotted lines).
Mentions: In a second analysis, we studied connections throughout the entire brain using correlation analyses between 110 cortical and subcortical brain areas and found a main effect of group. The results of post-hoc testing showed decreased pairwise connectivity in bvFTD compared with AD between the right superior temporal gyrus (Figure 3A, blue area, coronal slice) and the right cuneal cortex (Figure 3A, yellow, p < 0.0001), left cuneal cortex (p = 0.0002), the right supracalcarine cortex (Figure 3A, blue, p = 0.0002), left supracalcarine cortex (p = 0.0001), the right intracalcarine cortex (Figure 3A, pink, p = 0.0001), and the right lingual gyrus (Figure 3A, green, p = 0.0002).

Bottom Line: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus.In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex.Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Methodology and Statistics, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands ; Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center Leiden, Netherlands ; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study functional brain connectivity differences between AD and bvFTD.

Methods: We used resting state fMRI data of 31 AD patients, 25 bvFTD patients, and 29 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. We studied functional connectivity throughout the entire brain, applying two different analysis techniques, studying network-to-region and region-to-region connectivity. A general linear model approach was used to study group differences, while controlling for physiological noise, age, gender, study center, and regional gray matter volume.

Results: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus. In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex. Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus.

Conclusion: We showed that the pathophysiology of functional brain connectivity is different between AD and bvFTD. Our findings support the hypothesis that resting state fMRI shows disease-specific functional connectivity differences and is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD and bvFTD. However, the group differences in functional connectivity are less abundant than has been shown in previous studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus