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New insight into the residual inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa by dielectric barrier discharge.

Li L, Zhang H, Huang Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that the numbers of both dead and apoptotic cells increased with DBD treatment delay time, and hydrogen peroxide produced by DBD was the main reason for the time-delayed inactivation effect.However, apart from the influence of hydrogen peroxide, the DBD-induced initial injures on the algal cells during the discharge period also played a considerable role in the inactivation of the DBD treated cells, as indicated by the measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the algal cells.We therefore propose an effective approach to utilization of non-thermal plasma technique that makes good use of the residual inactivation effect to optimize the experimental conditions in terms of discharge time and delay time, so that more efficient treatment of cyanobacterial blooms can be achieved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Biotechnology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 230031.

ABSTRACT
We report the new insight into the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) induced inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa, the dominant algae which caused harmful cyanobacterial blooms in many developing countries. In contrast with the previous work, we employed flow cytometry to examine the algal cells, so that we could assess the dead and living cells with more accuracy, and distinguish an intermediate state of algal cells which were verified as apoptotic. Our results showed that the numbers of both dead and apoptotic cells increased with DBD treatment delay time, and hydrogen peroxide produced by DBD was the main reason for the time-delayed inactivation effect. However, apart from the influence of hydrogen peroxide, the DBD-induced initial injures on the algal cells during the discharge period also played a considerable role in the inactivation of the DBD treated cells, as indicated by the measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the algal cells. We therefore propose an effective approach to utilization of non-thermal plasma technique that makes good use of the residual inactivation effect to optimize the experimental conditions in terms of discharge time and delay time, so that more efficient treatment of cyanobacterial blooms can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.


The inactivation rate (A) and unit time inactivation rate (A′) of M. aeruginosa for DBD treated different treatment and delayed times.The experiment was repeated for three times.
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f6: The inactivation rate (A) and unit time inactivation rate (A′) of M. aeruginosa for DBD treated different treatment and delayed times.The experiment was repeated for three times.

Mentions: But, how to combine the virtues of DBD direct inactivation effect and its delayed inactivation effect, so that we can optimize the discharge conditions to achieve the economic and high efficiency DBD treatment? For this purpose, we tried to examine the residual effect more closely and determine the appropriate treatment time and delay time by defining the unit time inactivation rate, namely, A′ = A/T, where A is the total inactivation rate, T is the discharge time. Figure 6 shows the results of A and A′ which both change with the discharge time. However, different from A, A′ does not show a simple monotonic change with discharge time. Instead, it shows a maximum value which is also dependent on delay time. For example, for the 0 h delayed sample, the maximal A′ reaches at discharge time of 8 min; but for the 10 h delayed sample, 4 min of discharge time already ensures the maximal A′. So evaluation of the parameter A′ just suggests that it is not efficient to elongate the discharge time to achieve optimal inactivation effect, rather, balancing both the discharge and delay times properly can facilitate the best processing efficiency in terms of consumption of energy and time.


New insight into the residual inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa by dielectric barrier discharge.

Li L, Zhang H, Huang Q - Sci Rep (2015)

The inactivation rate (A) and unit time inactivation rate (A′) of M. aeruginosa for DBD treated different treatment and delayed times.The experiment was repeated for three times.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561898&req=5

f6: The inactivation rate (A) and unit time inactivation rate (A′) of M. aeruginosa for DBD treated different treatment and delayed times.The experiment was repeated for three times.
Mentions: But, how to combine the virtues of DBD direct inactivation effect and its delayed inactivation effect, so that we can optimize the discharge conditions to achieve the economic and high efficiency DBD treatment? For this purpose, we tried to examine the residual effect more closely and determine the appropriate treatment time and delay time by defining the unit time inactivation rate, namely, A′ = A/T, where A is the total inactivation rate, T is the discharge time. Figure 6 shows the results of A and A′ which both change with the discharge time. However, different from A, A′ does not show a simple monotonic change with discharge time. Instead, it shows a maximum value which is also dependent on delay time. For example, for the 0 h delayed sample, the maximal A′ reaches at discharge time of 8 min; but for the 10 h delayed sample, 4 min of discharge time already ensures the maximal A′. So evaluation of the parameter A′ just suggests that it is not efficient to elongate the discharge time to achieve optimal inactivation effect, rather, balancing both the discharge and delay times properly can facilitate the best processing efficiency in terms of consumption of energy and time.

Bottom Line: Our results showed that the numbers of both dead and apoptotic cells increased with DBD treatment delay time, and hydrogen peroxide produced by DBD was the main reason for the time-delayed inactivation effect.However, apart from the influence of hydrogen peroxide, the DBD-induced initial injures on the algal cells during the discharge period also played a considerable role in the inactivation of the DBD treated cells, as indicated by the measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the algal cells.We therefore propose an effective approach to utilization of non-thermal plasma technique that makes good use of the residual inactivation effect to optimize the experimental conditions in terms of discharge time and delay time, so that more efficient treatment of cyanobacterial blooms can be achieved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Biotechnology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 230031.

ABSTRACT
We report the new insight into the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) induced inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa, the dominant algae which caused harmful cyanobacterial blooms in many developing countries. In contrast with the previous work, we employed flow cytometry to examine the algal cells, so that we could assess the dead and living cells with more accuracy, and distinguish an intermediate state of algal cells which were verified as apoptotic. Our results showed that the numbers of both dead and apoptotic cells increased with DBD treatment delay time, and hydrogen peroxide produced by DBD was the main reason for the time-delayed inactivation effect. However, apart from the influence of hydrogen peroxide, the DBD-induced initial injures on the algal cells during the discharge period also played a considerable role in the inactivation of the DBD treated cells, as indicated by the measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the algal cells. We therefore propose an effective approach to utilization of non-thermal plasma technique that makes good use of the residual inactivation effect to optimize the experimental conditions in terms of discharge time and delay time, so that more efficient treatment of cyanobacterial blooms can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.