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Simultaneous Stress and Field Control of Sustainable Switching of Ferroelectric Phases.

Finkel P, Staruch M, Amin A, Ahart M, Lofland SE - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Direct tuning of this effect through combination of stress and applied electric field, confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically with x-ray and Raman scattering, reveals the local symmetry while sweeping through the transition with a low applied electric field (<0.2 MV/m) under mechanical stress.The observed change in local symmetry as determined by x-ray scattering confirms a proposed polarization rotation mechanism corresponding to a transition between rhombohedral and orthorhombic phases.These results shed more light onto the nature of this reversible transformation between two ferroelectric phases and advance towards the development of a wide range of ferroic and multiferroic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: US Naval research Laboratory, Washington DC, 20375.

ABSTRACT
In ferroelectrics, manifestation of a strong electromechanical coupling is attributed to both engineered domain morphology and phase transformations. However, realization of large sustainable and reversible strains and polarization rotation has been limited by fatigue, nonlinearity and hysteresis losses. Here, we demonstrate that large strain and polarization rotation can be generated for over 40 × 10(6) cycles with little fatigue by realization of a reversible ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in [011] cut Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. Direct tuning of this effect through combination of stress and applied electric field, confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically with x-ray and Raman scattering, reveals the local symmetry while sweeping through the transition with a low applied electric field (<0.2 MV/m) under mechanical stress. The observed change in local symmetry as determined by x-ray scattering confirms a proposed polarization rotation mechanism corresponding to a transition between rhombohedral and orthorhombic phases. These results shed more light onto the nature of this reversible transformation between two ferroelectric phases and advance towards the development of a wide range of ferroic and multiferroic devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Electric field dependent integrated intensity of peak at 54 cm−1 in VH mode for a pre-stressed PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.Dashed lines are given as a guide for the eyes. Error bars are shown for select points confirming that the hysteresis is statistically significant. The inset shows the change in susceptibility at several values of electric field.
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f2: Electric field dependent integrated intensity of peak at 54 cm−1 in VH mode for a pre-stressed PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.Dashed lines are given as a guide for the eyes. Error bars are shown for select points confirming that the hysteresis is statistically significant. The inset shows the change in susceptibility at several values of electric field.

Mentions: To investigate possible structural transitions, polarized (VV) and de-polarized (VH) Raman scattering measurements were done as a function of electric field E at a stress of 20 MPa with an Acton SP300i spectrometer with a 532 nm laser source with the average incident power of <10 mW. Spectra were taken at 298 K with an acquisition time of 100 seconds. The observed modes are all consistent with previous work on relaxor ferroelectrics2223. With applied electric field cycled ± 0.2 MV/m, there is a noticeable change in susceptibility (Fig. 2) and the intensities of the peak centered at 54 cm−1 (VH polarization) shows an asymmetric hysteresis loop, suggestive of a structural transition. However, no shift in peak position or abrupt discontinuity in intensity ratios are observed in contrast to what has previously been found at TC or at the tetragonal-to-rhombohedral transitions2223.


Simultaneous Stress and Field Control of Sustainable Switching of Ferroelectric Phases.

Finkel P, Staruch M, Amin A, Ahart M, Lofland SE - Sci Rep (2015)

Electric field dependent integrated intensity of peak at 54 cm−1 in VH mode for a pre-stressed PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.Dashed lines are given as a guide for the eyes. Error bars are shown for select points confirming that the hysteresis is statistically significant. The inset shows the change in susceptibility at several values of electric field.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561888&req=5

f2: Electric field dependent integrated intensity of peak at 54 cm−1 in VH mode for a pre-stressed PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.Dashed lines are given as a guide for the eyes. Error bars are shown for select points confirming that the hysteresis is statistically significant. The inset shows the change in susceptibility at several values of electric field.
Mentions: To investigate possible structural transitions, polarized (VV) and de-polarized (VH) Raman scattering measurements were done as a function of electric field E at a stress of 20 MPa with an Acton SP300i spectrometer with a 532 nm laser source with the average incident power of <10 mW. Spectra were taken at 298 K with an acquisition time of 100 seconds. The observed modes are all consistent with previous work on relaxor ferroelectrics2223. With applied electric field cycled ± 0.2 MV/m, there is a noticeable change in susceptibility (Fig. 2) and the intensities of the peak centered at 54 cm−1 (VH polarization) shows an asymmetric hysteresis loop, suggestive of a structural transition. However, no shift in peak position or abrupt discontinuity in intensity ratios are observed in contrast to what has previously been found at TC or at the tetragonal-to-rhombohedral transitions2223.

Bottom Line: Direct tuning of this effect through combination of stress and applied electric field, confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically with x-ray and Raman scattering, reveals the local symmetry while sweeping through the transition with a low applied electric field (<0.2 MV/m) under mechanical stress.The observed change in local symmetry as determined by x-ray scattering confirms a proposed polarization rotation mechanism corresponding to a transition between rhombohedral and orthorhombic phases.These results shed more light onto the nature of this reversible transformation between two ferroelectric phases and advance towards the development of a wide range of ferroic and multiferroic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: US Naval research Laboratory, Washington DC, 20375.

ABSTRACT
In ferroelectrics, manifestation of a strong electromechanical coupling is attributed to both engineered domain morphology and phase transformations. However, realization of large sustainable and reversible strains and polarization rotation has been limited by fatigue, nonlinearity and hysteresis losses. Here, we demonstrate that large strain and polarization rotation can be generated for over 40 × 10(6) cycles with little fatigue by realization of a reversible ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in [011] cut Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. Direct tuning of this effect through combination of stress and applied electric field, confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically with x-ray and Raman scattering, reveals the local symmetry while sweeping through the transition with a low applied electric field (<0.2 MV/m) under mechanical stress. The observed change in local symmetry as determined by x-ray scattering confirms a proposed polarization rotation mechanism corresponding to a transition between rhombohedral and orthorhombic phases. These results shed more light onto the nature of this reversible transformation between two ferroelectric phases and advance towards the development of a wide range of ferroic and multiferroic devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus