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Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean.

Johansen JL, Pratchett MS, Messmer V, Coker DJ, Tobin AJ, Hoey AS - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure.Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals.However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differences in (A) feeding frequency, (B) meal size and (C) average overall food intake between a low latitude (warm water) and a high latitude (cold water) population of common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) across four temperature treatments. Values of meal size and overall food intake are in % body-weight (% bw) and error bars are standard error of the mean. Significant differences within and across temperatures and populations are shown above each column.
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f3: Differences in (A) feeding frequency, (B) meal size and (C) average overall food intake between a low latitude (warm water) and a high latitude (cold water) population of common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) across four temperature treatments. Values of meal size and overall food intake are in % body-weight (% bw) and error bars are standard error of the mean. Significant differences within and across temperatures and populations are shown above each column.

Mentions: Low (14 °S) and high latitude (23 °S) populations showed no significant difference in body-size (F3,108 = 0.72, p = 0.584), the frequency of feeding (F1,108 = 0.79, p = 0.375), or weight change (F1,108 = 1.20, p = 0.277) between temperature conditions. In spite of these similarities, the low latitude (warm-water) population consistently ate larger meals and consumed more food per day across all temperatures examined (Meal size: F1,108 = 14.92, p < 0.001; Overall food intake: F1,108 = 8.82, p = 0.004, Fig. 3). On average, the low latitude population ate 4.5 ± 0.2%bw/meal and 1.6 ± 0.1%bw/day, relative to 3.7 ± 0.2%bw/meal and 1.3 ± 0.1%bw/day by the high latitude population (mean ± SE, Fig. 3). This indicates that populations may be able to adjust to 3 °C increases in temperature, allowing the warm-water population to consume 22% more food in every feeding event, without eating more frequently than the cold-water population.


Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean.

Johansen JL, Pratchett MS, Messmer V, Coker DJ, Tobin AJ, Hoey AS - Sci Rep (2015)

Differences in (A) feeding frequency, (B) meal size and (C) average overall food intake between a low latitude (warm water) and a high latitude (cold water) population of common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) across four temperature treatments. Values of meal size and overall food intake are in % body-weight (% bw) and error bars are standard error of the mean. Significant differences within and across temperatures and populations are shown above each column.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561880&req=5

f3: Differences in (A) feeding frequency, (B) meal size and (C) average overall food intake between a low latitude (warm water) and a high latitude (cold water) population of common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) across four temperature treatments. Values of meal size and overall food intake are in % body-weight (% bw) and error bars are standard error of the mean. Significant differences within and across temperatures and populations are shown above each column.
Mentions: Low (14 °S) and high latitude (23 °S) populations showed no significant difference in body-size (F3,108 = 0.72, p = 0.584), the frequency of feeding (F1,108 = 0.79, p = 0.375), or weight change (F1,108 = 1.20, p = 0.277) between temperature conditions. In spite of these similarities, the low latitude (warm-water) population consistently ate larger meals and consumed more food per day across all temperatures examined (Meal size: F1,108 = 14.92, p < 0.001; Overall food intake: F1,108 = 8.82, p = 0.004, Fig. 3). On average, the low latitude population ate 4.5 ± 0.2%bw/meal and 1.6 ± 0.1%bw/day, relative to 3.7 ± 0.2%bw/meal and 1.3 ± 0.1%bw/day by the high latitude population (mean ± SE, Fig. 3). This indicates that populations may be able to adjust to 3 °C increases in temperature, allowing the warm-water population to consume 22% more food in every feeding event, without eating more frequently than the cold-water population.

Bottom Line: If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure.Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals.However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus