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Effects of a Health Promotion Program Based on a Train-the-Trainer Approach on Quality of Life and Mental Health of Long-Term Unemployed Persons.

Limm H, Heinmüller M, Gündel H, Liel K, Seeger K, Salman R, Angerer P - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Long-term unemployment is associated with poorer mental health.A significant intervention effect was observed for anxiety (p = 0.012).The health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on HRQoL and mental health, especially anxiety, of long-term unemployed persons, a highly burdened target group where an improvement in mental health is a crucial prerequisite to social participation and successful reintegration into the job market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long-term unemployment is associated with poorer mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a health promotion program using the train-the-trainer approach on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mental health of long-term unemployed persons.

Methods: A prospective parallel-group study was conducted among 365 long-term unemployed persons. 287 participants (179 members of the intervention group IG and 108 members of the control group) were reassessed after three months. The intervention comprised both individual sessions based on Motivational Interviewing and participatory group sessions; no health promotion program was administered in the control group. The endpoints were HRQoL (SF-12), depression, and anxiety. The effect size of the change across time in the IG and CG was measured by Cohen's d. To assess the significance of group differences in the change across time, a random effects model was used.

Results: Within three months HRQoL improved and anxiety and depression decreased significantly in the IG. A significant intervention effect was observed for anxiety (p = 0.012). Effect sizes in the IG were small to moderate in terms of Cohen's d (anxiety: d = -0.33; SF-12 mental: d = 0.31; depression: d = -0.25; SF-12 physical: d = 0.19).

Conclusions: The health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on HRQoL and mental health, especially anxiety, of long-term unemployed persons, a highly burdened target group where an improvement in mental health is a crucial prerequisite to social participation and successful reintegration into the job market.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant flow during the study and response at 3-month follow-up.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Participant flow during the study and response at 3-month follow-up.

Mentions: Members of the study team offered information sessions on the health promotion program and the study conditions directly to eligible participants at each setting. A small incentive was given to enhance study participation. Participation in the study was voluntary. Written informed consent was obtained. All volunteers were required to complete a set of questionnaires and participate in a basic medical examination. This health check was conducted by a physician and included feedback to each participant. In total, 418 unemployed persons were eligible at the two study centers and agreed to participate in the study. As 53 persons did not meet the inclusion criteria, at baseline 365 persons (87.3% of those interested) were finally enrolled in the study: 224 in the IG and 141 in the CG (Figure 1). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Munich.


Effects of a Health Promotion Program Based on a Train-the-Trainer Approach on Quality of Life and Mental Health of Long-Term Unemployed Persons.

Limm H, Heinmüller M, Gündel H, Liel K, Seeger K, Salman R, Angerer P - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Participant flow during the study and response at 3-month follow-up.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561875&req=5

fig1: Participant flow during the study and response at 3-month follow-up.
Mentions: Members of the study team offered information sessions on the health promotion program and the study conditions directly to eligible participants at each setting. A small incentive was given to enhance study participation. Participation in the study was voluntary. Written informed consent was obtained. All volunteers were required to complete a set of questionnaires and participate in a basic medical examination. This health check was conducted by a physician and included feedback to each participant. In total, 418 unemployed persons were eligible at the two study centers and agreed to participate in the study. As 53 persons did not meet the inclusion criteria, at baseline 365 persons (87.3% of those interested) were finally enrolled in the study: 224 in the IG and 141 in the CG (Figure 1). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Munich.

Bottom Line: Long-term unemployment is associated with poorer mental health.A significant intervention effect was observed for anxiety (p = 0.012).The health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on HRQoL and mental health, especially anxiety, of long-term unemployed persons, a highly burdened target group where an improvement in mental health is a crucial prerequisite to social participation and successful reintegration into the job market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long-term unemployment is associated with poorer mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a health promotion program using the train-the-trainer approach on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mental health of long-term unemployed persons.

Methods: A prospective parallel-group study was conducted among 365 long-term unemployed persons. 287 participants (179 members of the intervention group IG and 108 members of the control group) were reassessed after three months. The intervention comprised both individual sessions based on Motivational Interviewing and participatory group sessions; no health promotion program was administered in the control group. The endpoints were HRQoL (SF-12), depression, and anxiety. The effect size of the change across time in the IG and CG was measured by Cohen's d. To assess the significance of group differences in the change across time, a random effects model was used.

Results: Within three months HRQoL improved and anxiety and depression decreased significantly in the IG. A significant intervention effect was observed for anxiety (p = 0.012). Effect sizes in the IG were small to moderate in terms of Cohen's d (anxiety: d = -0.33; SF-12 mental: d = 0.31; depression: d = -0.25; SF-12 physical: d = 0.19).

Conclusions: The health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on HRQoL and mental health, especially anxiety, of long-term unemployed persons, a highly burdened target group where an improvement in mental health is a crucial prerequisite to social participation and successful reintegration into the job market.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus