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Adherence, Compliance, and Health Risk Factor Changes following Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions.

Norton LH, Norton KI, Lewis NR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls.The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Low physical activity (PA) levels are associated with poor health risk factor profiles. Intervention strategies to increase PA and quantify the rate and magnitude of change in risk factors are important.

Methods: Interventions were conducted over 40 days to increase PA in 736 insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA) participants using either a pedometer or instructor-led group protocol. There were a further 135 active participants as controls. Major cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, including fitness parameters, were measured before and after intervention.

Results: Adherence to the interventions was higher for the group versus pedometer participants (87.1% versus 79.8%) and compliance rates for achieving sufficient levels of PA (≥150 min/wk) were also higher for the group participants (95.8% versus 77.6%). Total weekly PA patterns increased by 300 and 435 minutes, for the pedometer and group participants, respectively. Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls. The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.

Conclusions: Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

No MeSH data available.


Histograms showing the changes in total PA, vigorous PA, VO2max⁡, DBP, and weight across the 40-day interventions. Participants in both treatment groups have been included.
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fig2: Histograms showing the changes in total PA, vigorous PA, VO2max⁡, DBP, and weight across the 40-day interventions. Participants in both treatment groups have been included.

Mentions: Table 1 shows that the PA increases were significantly greater for the group-based participants. The control participants' PA levels were extremely stable across the study, although there was a large range among individuals within both the intervention and control groups. Pre- and postintervention changes varied among participants within both intervention arms. Figure 2 illustrates the range of change for several variables. While the vast majority increased their PA patterns (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)) there were not always corresponding individual changes in other health risk factors, for example, VO2max⁡ (Figure 2(c)), DBP (Figure 2(d)), and weight (Figure 2(e)).


Adherence, Compliance, and Health Risk Factor Changes following Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions.

Norton LH, Norton KI, Lewis NR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Histograms showing the changes in total PA, vigorous PA, VO2max⁡, DBP, and weight across the 40-day interventions. Participants in both treatment groups have been included.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561868&req=5

fig2: Histograms showing the changes in total PA, vigorous PA, VO2max⁡, DBP, and weight across the 40-day interventions. Participants in both treatment groups have been included.
Mentions: Table 1 shows that the PA increases were significantly greater for the group-based participants. The control participants' PA levels were extremely stable across the study, although there was a large range among individuals within both the intervention and control groups. Pre- and postintervention changes varied among participants within both intervention arms. Figure 2 illustrates the range of change for several variables. While the vast majority increased their PA patterns (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)) there were not always corresponding individual changes in other health risk factors, for example, VO2max⁡ (Figure 2(c)), DBP (Figure 2(d)), and weight (Figure 2(e)).

Bottom Line: Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls.The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Low physical activity (PA) levels are associated with poor health risk factor profiles. Intervention strategies to increase PA and quantify the rate and magnitude of change in risk factors are important.

Methods: Interventions were conducted over 40 days to increase PA in 736 insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA) participants using either a pedometer or instructor-led group protocol. There were a further 135 active participants as controls. Major cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, including fitness parameters, were measured before and after intervention.

Results: Adherence to the interventions was higher for the group versus pedometer participants (87.1% versus 79.8%) and compliance rates for achieving sufficient levels of PA (≥150 min/wk) were also higher for the group participants (95.8% versus 77.6%). Total weekly PA patterns increased by 300 and 435 minutes, for the pedometer and group participants, respectively. Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls. The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.

Conclusions: Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

No MeSH data available.