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Adherence, Compliance, and Health Risk Factor Changes following Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions.

Norton LH, Norton KI, Lewis NR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls.The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Low physical activity (PA) levels are associated with poor health risk factor profiles. Intervention strategies to increase PA and quantify the rate and magnitude of change in risk factors are important.

Methods: Interventions were conducted over 40 days to increase PA in 736 insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA) participants using either a pedometer or instructor-led group protocol. There were a further 135 active participants as controls. Major cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, including fitness parameters, were measured before and after intervention.

Results: Adherence to the interventions was higher for the group versus pedometer participants (87.1% versus 79.8%) and compliance rates for achieving sufficient levels of PA (≥150 min/wk) were also higher for the group participants (95.8% versus 77.6%). Total weekly PA patterns increased by 300 and 435 minutes, for the pedometer and group participants, respectively. Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls. The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.

Conclusions: Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

No MeSH data available.


Flow of participants with compliance and adherence percentages for the different study arms and for randomised (R) versus nonrandomised (NR) participants. Compliance was calculated as the proportion of (1) total intervention days the participants achieved the prescribed daily activity targets and (2) participants sufficiently active at postintervention. Adherence was calculated as the proportion of participants remaining in the program at each stage shown.
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fig1: Flow of participants with compliance and adherence percentages for the different study arms and for randomised (R) versus nonrandomised (NR) participants. Compliance was calculated as the proportion of (1) total intervention days the participants achieved the prescribed daily activity targets and (2) participants sufficiently active at postintervention. Adherence was calculated as the proportion of participants remaining in the program at each stage shown.

Mentions: Given the fact that the volunteers had a low activity base, both interventions started conservatively and progressed in intensity and/or volume over the duration of the programs. No effort was made to control for total energy expenditure or maximum minutes of exercise undertaken. The active controls undertook testing only and were given no instructions about their PA patterns in between testing times. The flow of participants into the three research arms is illustrated in Figure 1. It also shows the total number of participants in each of the PA intervention arms and the breakdown of random versus nonrandom subjects. Randomisation for the RCT was conducted after health and fitness testing. Subjects were assigned to either the group-based (n = 155) or pedometer (n = 157) intervention arm using computer-generated numbers. There were 135 active control subjects who undertook the pre- and postintervention testing. All other participants (n = 424) chose which intervention arm they would join.


Adherence, Compliance, and Health Risk Factor Changes following Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions.

Norton LH, Norton KI, Lewis NR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Flow of participants with compliance and adherence percentages for the different study arms and for randomised (R) versus nonrandomised (NR) participants. Compliance was calculated as the proportion of (1) total intervention days the participants achieved the prescribed daily activity targets and (2) participants sufficiently active at postintervention. Adherence was calculated as the proportion of participants remaining in the program at each stage shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561868&req=5

fig1: Flow of participants with compliance and adherence percentages for the different study arms and for randomised (R) versus nonrandomised (NR) participants. Compliance was calculated as the proportion of (1) total intervention days the participants achieved the prescribed daily activity targets and (2) participants sufficiently active at postintervention. Adherence was calculated as the proportion of participants remaining in the program at each stage shown.
Mentions: Given the fact that the volunteers had a low activity base, both interventions started conservatively and progressed in intensity and/or volume over the duration of the programs. No effort was made to control for total energy expenditure or maximum minutes of exercise undertaken. The active controls undertook testing only and were given no instructions about their PA patterns in between testing times. The flow of participants into the three research arms is illustrated in Figure 1. It also shows the total number of participants in each of the PA intervention arms and the breakdown of random versus nonrandom subjects. Randomisation for the RCT was conducted after health and fitness testing. Subjects were assigned to either the group-based (n = 155) or pedometer (n = 157) intervention arm using computer-generated numbers. There were 135 active control subjects who undertook the pre- and postintervention testing. All other participants (n = 424) chose which intervention arm they would join.

Bottom Line: Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls.The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Low physical activity (PA) levels are associated with poor health risk factor profiles. Intervention strategies to increase PA and quantify the rate and magnitude of change in risk factors are important.

Methods: Interventions were conducted over 40 days to increase PA in 736 insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA) participants using either a pedometer or instructor-led group protocol. There were a further 135 active participants as controls. Major cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, including fitness parameters, were measured before and after intervention.

Results: Adherence to the interventions was higher for the group versus pedometer participants (87.1% versus 79.8%) and compliance rates for achieving sufficient levels of PA (≥150 min/wk) were also higher for the group participants (95.8% versus 77.6%). Total weekly PA patterns increased by 300 and 435 minutes, for the pedometer and group participants, respectively. Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls. The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured.

Conclusions: Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

No MeSH data available.