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Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

Yu C, An Z, Zhao W, Wang W, Gao C, Liu S, Wang J, Wu J - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China.Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05.Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital , Tianjin , China ; Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurodegenerative Disease , Tianjin , China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients.

Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded.

Results: Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors.

Conclusion: Elderly women with AIS had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-AIS patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Figure 1: Flow diagram of participants.

Mentions: A total of 6695 patients with first-ever AIS were recruited during the study period, 1484 patients were included in this study after excluding 5211 patients aged <75 years. Of these patients, the mean age of stroke onset was 79.63 ± 4.00 years (from 75 to 96) overall; 79.69 ± 3.99 years (from 75 to 96) in men, and 79.55 ± 4.01 years (from 75 to 95) in women. The responding rate was 94.43% at 3 months after AIS, and 88.17% at 12 months after AIS (Figure 1).


Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

Yu C, An Z, Zhao W, Wang W, Gao C, Liu S, Wang J, Wu J - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Flow diagram of participants.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561826&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of participants.
Mentions: A total of 6695 patients with first-ever AIS were recruited during the study period, 1484 patients were included in this study after excluding 5211 patients aged <75 years. Of these patients, the mean age of stroke onset was 79.63 ± 4.00 years (from 75 to 96) overall; 79.69 ± 3.99 years (from 75 to 96) in men, and 79.55 ± 4.01 years (from 75 to 95) in women. The responding rate was 94.43% at 3 months after AIS, and 88.17% at 12 months after AIS (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China.Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05.Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital , Tianjin , China ; Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurodegenerative Disease , Tianjin , China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients.

Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded.

Results: Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors.

Conclusion: Elderly women with AIS had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-AIS patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus