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Geriatric Respondents and Non-Respondents to Probiotic Intervention Can be Differentiated by Inherent Gut Microbiome Composition.

Senan S, Prajapati JB, Joshi CG, Sreeja V, Gohel MK, Trivedi S, Patel RM, Pandya H, Singh US, Phatak A, Patel HA - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Among respondents and non-respondents, the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002), while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002).We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers.Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dairy Science, South Dakota State University , Brookings, SD , USA.

ABSTRACT

Scope: Probiotic interventions are known to have been shown to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota in geriatrics. The growing concern is the apparent variation in response to identical strain dosage among human volunteers. One factor that governs this variation is the host gut microbiome. In this study, we attempted to define a core gut metagenome, which could act as a predisposition signature marker of inherent bacterial community that can help predict the success of a probiotic intervention.

Methods and results: To characterize the geriatric gut microbiome, we designed primers targeting the 16S rRNA hypervariable region V2-V3 followed by semiconductor sequencing using Ion Torrent PGM. Among respondents and non-respondents, the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002), while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002).

Conclusion: We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers. Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Analysis of significance in abundance of (A) Firmicutes and (B) Proteobacteria among respondents and non-respondents using two-sample Fischer’s exact test.
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Figure 6: Analysis of significance in abundance of (A) Firmicutes and (B) Proteobacteria among respondents and non-respondents using two-sample Fischer’s exact test.

Mentions: A remarkable significant difference among the chief genera of Proteobacteria including Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia, and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002) was observed. The chief genera of Firmicutes that showed remarkable significant difference were Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002) (Figure 6). Although non-respondents carried a higher proportion of Lactobacilli, a favorable physiological function may not be translated to the host possibly due to an increase in Clostidum, Shigella, and Eschericihia with a decrease in Blautia and Burkholderia. We would like to add that the results of population wide samples taken at one time point for a study might not be able to display the entire variation that exists in that population over time and place.


Geriatric Respondents and Non-Respondents to Probiotic Intervention Can be Differentiated by Inherent Gut Microbiome Composition.

Senan S, Prajapati JB, Joshi CG, Sreeja V, Gohel MK, Trivedi S, Patel RM, Pandya H, Singh US, Phatak A, Patel HA - Front Microbiol (2015)

Analysis of significance in abundance of (A) Firmicutes and (B) Proteobacteria among respondents and non-respondents using two-sample Fischer’s exact test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561823&req=5

Figure 6: Analysis of significance in abundance of (A) Firmicutes and (B) Proteobacteria among respondents and non-respondents using two-sample Fischer’s exact test.
Mentions: A remarkable significant difference among the chief genera of Proteobacteria including Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia, and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002) was observed. The chief genera of Firmicutes that showed remarkable significant difference were Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002) (Figure 6). Although non-respondents carried a higher proportion of Lactobacilli, a favorable physiological function may not be translated to the host possibly due to an increase in Clostidum, Shigella, and Eschericihia with a decrease in Blautia and Burkholderia. We would like to add that the results of population wide samples taken at one time point for a study might not be able to display the entire variation that exists in that population over time and place.

Bottom Line: Among respondents and non-respondents, the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002), while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002).We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers.Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dairy Science, South Dakota State University , Brookings, SD , USA.

ABSTRACT

Scope: Probiotic interventions are known to have been shown to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota in geriatrics. The growing concern is the apparent variation in response to identical strain dosage among human volunteers. One factor that governs this variation is the host gut microbiome. In this study, we attempted to define a core gut metagenome, which could act as a predisposition signature marker of inherent bacterial community that can help predict the success of a probiotic intervention.

Methods and results: To characterize the geriatric gut microbiome, we designed primers targeting the 16S rRNA hypervariable region V2-V3 followed by semiconductor sequencing using Ion Torrent PGM. Among respondents and non-respondents, the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q < 0.002), while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q < 0.002).

Conclusion: We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers. Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus