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Natural variation in cross-talk between glucosinolates and onset of flowering in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Jepsen HS, Halkier BA, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions.This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes.This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, DNRF Center DynaMo, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Naturally variable regulatory networks control different biological processes including reproduction and defense. This variation within regulatory networks enables plants to optimize defense and reproduction in different environments. In this study we investigate the ability of two enzyme-encoding genes in the glucosinolate pathway, AOP2 and AOP3, to affect glucosinolate accumulation and flowering time. We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions. This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes. While the changes in glucosinolate levels were similar in both accessions, the effect on flowering time was dependent on the genetic background pointing to natural variation in cross-talk between defense chemistry and onset of flowering. This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

QTL mapping for flowering time in the Col-0 × Cph-0. QTL mapping in an F2 population derived from a Col-0 × Cph-0 cross revealed two significant loci (X129 and X188) controlling flowering time.
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Figure 6: QTL mapping for flowering time in the Col-0 × Cph-0. QTL mapping in an F2 population derived from a Col-0 × Cph-0 cross revealed two significant loci (X129 and X188) controlling flowering time.

Mentions: QTL mapping for flowering time revealed two loci (X29 and X188) as the major QTLs (Figure 6, Table 1). We found FT and FLC as the top candidate genes in these loci (candidate gene list from Grillo et al., 2013). Therefore, we analyzed the transcript levels of FT and FLC in the two accessions and found FT expression in Cph-0 to be 1–2% of the transcript level in Col-0, while FLC transcript levels were around 500 times higher in Cph-0 than in Col-0 (Table 2). This is in agreement with the observed difference in flowering time between the two accessions, as FLC delays flowering time by repressing FT expression. This difference suggests that the ability to detect the influence of the AOP2 and AOP3 genes on flowering may depend on the allelic status at these known major effect flowering time genes in Arabidopsis. Further work is needed to assess how the AOP2 or AOP3 genes interplay with these known flowering time genes.


Natural variation in cross-talk between glucosinolates and onset of flowering in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Jepsen HS, Halkier BA, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

QTL mapping for flowering time in the Col-0 × Cph-0. QTL mapping in an F2 population derived from a Col-0 × Cph-0 cross revealed two significant loci (X129 and X188) controlling flowering time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561820&req=5

Figure 6: QTL mapping for flowering time in the Col-0 × Cph-0. QTL mapping in an F2 population derived from a Col-0 × Cph-0 cross revealed two significant loci (X129 and X188) controlling flowering time.
Mentions: QTL mapping for flowering time revealed two loci (X29 and X188) as the major QTLs (Figure 6, Table 1). We found FT and FLC as the top candidate genes in these loci (candidate gene list from Grillo et al., 2013). Therefore, we analyzed the transcript levels of FT and FLC in the two accessions and found FT expression in Cph-0 to be 1–2% of the transcript level in Col-0, while FLC transcript levels were around 500 times higher in Cph-0 than in Col-0 (Table 2). This is in agreement with the observed difference in flowering time between the two accessions, as FLC delays flowering time by repressing FT expression. This difference suggests that the ability to detect the influence of the AOP2 and AOP3 genes on flowering may depend on the allelic status at these known major effect flowering time genes in Arabidopsis. Further work is needed to assess how the AOP2 or AOP3 genes interplay with these known flowering time genes.

Bottom Line: We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions.This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes.This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, DNRF Center DynaMo, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Naturally variable regulatory networks control different biological processes including reproduction and defense. This variation within regulatory networks enables plants to optimize defense and reproduction in different environments. In this study we investigate the ability of two enzyme-encoding genes in the glucosinolate pathway, AOP2 and AOP3, to affect glucosinolate accumulation and flowering time. We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions. This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes. While the changes in glucosinolate levels were similar in both accessions, the effect on flowering time was dependent on the genetic background pointing to natural variation in cross-talk between defense chemistry and onset of flowering. This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus