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Natural variation in cross-talk between glucosinolates and onset of flowering in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Jepsen HS, Halkier BA, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions.This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes.This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, DNRF Center DynaMo, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Naturally variable regulatory networks control different biological processes including reproduction and defense. This variation within regulatory networks enables plants to optimize defense and reproduction in different environments. In this study we investigate the ability of two enzyme-encoding genes in the glucosinolate pathway, AOP2 and AOP3, to affect glucosinolate accumulation and flowering time. We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions. This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes. While the changes in glucosinolate levels were similar in both accessions, the effect on flowering time was dependent on the genetic background pointing to natural variation in cross-talk between defense chemistry and onset of flowering. This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AOP2 and AOP3 have been associated with natural variation in different phenotypes. The GS-AOP locus encoding the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzymes AOP2 and AOP3 has been associated with variation in glucosinolate profiles due to their enzymatic activities. The same genes have been linked to changes in glucosinolate levels and onset of flowering in different natural variation studies.
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Figure 1: AOP2 and AOP3 have been associated with natural variation in different phenotypes. The GS-AOP locus encoding the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzymes AOP2 and AOP3 has been associated with variation in glucosinolate profiles due to their enzymatic activities. The same genes have been linked to changes in glucosinolate levels and onset of flowering in different natural variation studies.

Mentions: To identify genes involved in cross-talk between growth and defense, we focused on Arabidopsis natural variation studies. Numerous studies have identified key genes controlling natural variation in the plastic timing of flowering time and thereby reproduction (Koornneef et al., 1991; Michaels and Amasino, 1999; Johanson et al., 2000; El-Din El-Assal et al., 2001; Salomé et al., 2011; Ward et al., 2012; Grillo et al., 2013; Méndez-Vigo et al., 2013). Similarly, natural variation studies in the primary Arabidopsis defense compounds, the glucosinolates produced from tryptophan (indole glucosinolates) and methionine (aliphatic glucosinolates), have aimed at understanding the diversity in glucosinolate profiles (Kliebenstein et al., 2001a,b; Hirai et al., 2005; Keurentjes et al., 2006; Wentzell et al., 2007; Rowe et al., 2008; Jensen et al., 2014). Cross-talk between the networks controlling flowering and glucosinolate profiles seems to occur, as glucosinolate biosynthetic genes within the GS-AOP locus have been associated with not only glucosinolate biosynthesis, but also the control of onset of flowering (Figure 1), (Atwell et al., 2010; Kerwin et al., 2011). Hence, the genes in this locus may help illuminate the cross-talk between defense and flowering time in Arabidopsis.


Natural variation in cross-talk between glucosinolates and onset of flowering in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Jepsen HS, Halkier BA, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

AOP2 and AOP3 have been associated with natural variation in different phenotypes. The GS-AOP locus encoding the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzymes AOP2 and AOP3 has been associated with variation in glucosinolate profiles due to their enzymatic activities. The same genes have been linked to changes in glucosinolate levels and onset of flowering in different natural variation studies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561820&req=5

Figure 1: AOP2 and AOP3 have been associated with natural variation in different phenotypes. The GS-AOP locus encoding the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzymes AOP2 and AOP3 has been associated with variation in glucosinolate profiles due to their enzymatic activities. The same genes have been linked to changes in glucosinolate levels and onset of flowering in different natural variation studies.
Mentions: To identify genes involved in cross-talk between growth and defense, we focused on Arabidopsis natural variation studies. Numerous studies have identified key genes controlling natural variation in the plastic timing of flowering time and thereby reproduction (Koornneef et al., 1991; Michaels and Amasino, 1999; Johanson et al., 2000; El-Din El-Assal et al., 2001; Salomé et al., 2011; Ward et al., 2012; Grillo et al., 2013; Méndez-Vigo et al., 2013). Similarly, natural variation studies in the primary Arabidopsis defense compounds, the glucosinolates produced from tryptophan (indole glucosinolates) and methionine (aliphatic glucosinolates), have aimed at understanding the diversity in glucosinolate profiles (Kliebenstein et al., 2001a,b; Hirai et al., 2005; Keurentjes et al., 2006; Wentzell et al., 2007; Rowe et al., 2008; Jensen et al., 2014). Cross-talk between the networks controlling flowering and glucosinolate profiles seems to occur, as glucosinolate biosynthetic genes within the GS-AOP locus have been associated with not only glucosinolate biosynthesis, but also the control of onset of flowering (Figure 1), (Atwell et al., 2010; Kerwin et al., 2011). Hence, the genes in this locus may help illuminate the cross-talk between defense and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

Bottom Line: We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions.This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes.This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, DNRF Center DynaMo, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Naturally variable regulatory networks control different biological processes including reproduction and defense. This variation within regulatory networks enables plants to optimize defense and reproduction in different environments. In this study we investigate the ability of two enzyme-encoding genes in the glucosinolate pathway, AOP2 and AOP3, to affect glucosinolate accumulation and flowering time. We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOP () accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions. This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes. While the changes in glucosinolate levels were similar in both accessions, the effect on flowering time was dependent on the genetic background pointing to natural variation in cross-talk between defense chemistry and onset of flowering. This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus