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Cryotolerance of apple tree bud is independent of endodormancy.

Bilavcik A, Zamecnik J, Faltus M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The cryosurvival of vegetative apple buds of both cultivars correlated with their cold hardening without direct regard to their particular phase of dormancy.Both cultivars had the highest cryosurvival in December and January.The presented data were compared with our previous results from a dormancy study of in vitro apple culture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Physiology and Cryobiology Laboratory, Crop Research Institute Prague, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Increasing interest in cryopreservation of dormant buds reveals the need for better understanding of the role of dormancy in cryotolerance. Dormancy stage and low-temperature survival of vegetative apple buds (Malus domestica Borkh.), cultivars 'Sampion' and 'Spartan', collected from orchard were evaluated during three seasons contrasting in temperature and precipitation throughout the arrested plant growth period. During each season, the cultivars differed either in the onset of the endodormancy or in the length of the endodormant period. A simple relation between endodormancy of the buds and their water content was not detected. The cryosurvival of vegetative apple buds of both cultivars correlated with their cold hardening without direct regard to their particular phase of dormancy. The period of the highest bud cryotolerance after low-temperature exposure overlapped with the endodormant period in some evaluated seasons. Both cultivars had the highest cryosurvival in December and January. The presented data were compared with our previous results from a dormancy study of in vitro apple culture. Endodormancy coincided with the period of successful cryosurvival of apple buds after liquid nitrogen exposure, but as such, it was not decisive for their survival and did not limit their successful cryopreservation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative sum of day temperatures above 10°C (A) and day precipitation (B) in orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, Czech Republic, during three seasons of 1998, 1999, and 2000.
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Figure 1: Cumulative sum of day temperatures above 10°C (A) and day precipitation (B) in orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, Czech Republic, during three seasons of 1998, 1999, and 2000.

Mentions: One-year shoots of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) cultivar ‘Sampion’ and ‘Spartan’ were taken from trees in an orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, during three winter seasons of 1998/1999, 1999/2000, and 2000/2001. Both cultivars were grown on M4 rootstocks. The apple trees of cultivar ‘Sampion’ and ‘Spartan’ were 16 and 7 years old, respectively. The cultivars were selected because of a good resistance to low temperatures. The orchard location is characterized by altitude 350 m. a. s. l., 7.9°C average annual temperature, 394 mm average annual precipitation, and the average day length from August to November from 14.5 h to 9 h 5 min, respectively. The temperature and precipitation for a period of time before sampling the shoots is shown in Figure 1. One-year shoots were sampled from the treetop between 9 am and 11 am in 1-week intervals from September to March. The middle part of shoots was cut into one-nodal segments. Water content was evaluated in a set of three randomly sampled one-nodal segments per variant. They were weighed immediately after cutting, and then put into dryer and dried out at the temperature 105°C for at least 48 h into constant weight. The water content was counted as a difference between fresh and dry weight and expressed gravimetrically in gH2O g-1dry matter (DM).


Cryotolerance of apple tree bud is independent of endodormancy.

Bilavcik A, Zamecnik J, Faltus M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Cumulative sum of day temperatures above 10°C (A) and day precipitation (B) in orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, Czech Republic, during three seasons of 1998, 1999, and 2000.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561819&req=5

Figure 1: Cumulative sum of day temperatures above 10°C (A) and day precipitation (B) in orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, Czech Republic, during three seasons of 1998, 1999, and 2000.
Mentions: One-year shoots of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) cultivar ‘Sampion’ and ‘Spartan’ were taken from trees in an orchard of Crop Research Institute, Prague, during three winter seasons of 1998/1999, 1999/2000, and 2000/2001. Both cultivars were grown on M4 rootstocks. The apple trees of cultivar ‘Sampion’ and ‘Spartan’ were 16 and 7 years old, respectively. The cultivars were selected because of a good resistance to low temperatures. The orchard location is characterized by altitude 350 m. a. s. l., 7.9°C average annual temperature, 394 mm average annual precipitation, and the average day length from August to November from 14.5 h to 9 h 5 min, respectively. The temperature and precipitation for a period of time before sampling the shoots is shown in Figure 1. One-year shoots were sampled from the treetop between 9 am and 11 am in 1-week intervals from September to March. The middle part of shoots was cut into one-nodal segments. Water content was evaluated in a set of three randomly sampled one-nodal segments per variant. They were weighed immediately after cutting, and then put into dryer and dried out at the temperature 105°C for at least 48 h into constant weight. The water content was counted as a difference between fresh and dry weight and expressed gravimetrically in gH2O g-1dry matter (DM).

Bottom Line: The cryosurvival of vegetative apple buds of both cultivars correlated with their cold hardening without direct regard to their particular phase of dormancy.Both cultivars had the highest cryosurvival in December and January.The presented data were compared with our previous results from a dormancy study of in vitro apple culture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Physiology and Cryobiology Laboratory, Crop Research Institute Prague, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Increasing interest in cryopreservation of dormant buds reveals the need for better understanding of the role of dormancy in cryotolerance. Dormancy stage and low-temperature survival of vegetative apple buds (Malus domestica Borkh.), cultivars 'Sampion' and 'Spartan', collected from orchard were evaluated during three seasons contrasting in temperature and precipitation throughout the arrested plant growth period. During each season, the cultivars differed either in the onset of the endodormancy or in the length of the endodormant period. A simple relation between endodormancy of the buds and their water content was not detected. The cryosurvival of vegetative apple buds of both cultivars correlated with their cold hardening without direct regard to their particular phase of dormancy. The period of the highest bud cryotolerance after low-temperature exposure overlapped with the endodormant period in some evaluated seasons. Both cultivars had the highest cryosurvival in December and January. The presented data were compared with our previous results from a dormancy study of in vitro apple culture. Endodormancy coincided with the period of successful cryosurvival of apple buds after liquid nitrogen exposure, but as such, it was not decisive for their survival and did not limit their successful cryopreservation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus