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Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain.

Jones LJ, McCutcheon JE, Young AM, Norton WH - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon.We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain.This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, University of Leicester Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT
The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of stimulation with high K+ aCSF with- and without HEPES buffer. (A) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF without HEPES. The same color plot is shown in Figure 2A. (B) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF containing HEPES buffer. Thick dashed white line shows the time point and potential at which the first analyte was maximal. Thin dashed white line shows the time point at which the second analyte was observed. Current vs. time plots for responses obtained in high K+ aCSF without HEPES (C) (same traces as shown in Figures 2C,E for comparison) compared to aCSF containing HEPES buffer (D). Blue lines show dopamine-like current and black lines show histamine-like current. (E) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thick dashed white line in (B). Circle corresponds to blue line in (D). (F) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thin white line in (B). Circle corresponds to black line in (D).
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Figure 5: Comparison of stimulation with high K+ aCSF with- and without HEPES buffer. (A) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF without HEPES. The same color plot is shown in Figure 2A. (B) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF containing HEPES buffer. Thick dashed white line shows the time point and potential at which the first analyte was maximal. Thin dashed white line shows the time point at which the second analyte was observed. Current vs. time plots for responses obtained in high K+ aCSF without HEPES (C) (same traces as shown in Figures 2C,E for comparison) compared to aCSF containing HEPES buffer (D). Blue lines show dopamine-like current and black lines show histamine-like current. (E) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thick dashed white line in (B). Circle corresponds to blue line in (D). (F) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thin white line in (B). Circle corresponds to black line in (D).

Mentions: We investigated whether a shift in pH could be contributing to the changes in the current that we measured by adding HEPES buffer to the aCSF. Stimulation using high K+ HEPES-buffered aCSF altered the release profile of analytes occurring at the oxidation and reduction potentials for both dopamine and histamine. The large dip normally present at ~10 s after application of high K+ aCSF was reduced (compare Figure 5A and Figure 5C with Figure 5B and Figure 5D). Furthermore, addition of HEPES caused the current to return to baseline following stimulation (Figure 5D) suggesting a less prominent shift in background signal. The resulting voltammogram, taken ~10 s after stimulation, (Figure 5E) no longer showed a large reduction in signal at around +0.2 V which seemed to mask the oxidation peak at +0.6 V in previous experiments (compare to Figures 3A,C). A second cyclic voltammogram taken ~30 s after stimulation showed a small increase in current observed at ~ +0.7 V (Figure 5F).


Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain.

Jones LJ, McCutcheon JE, Young AM, Norton WH - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Comparison of stimulation with high K+ aCSF with- and without HEPES buffer. (A) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF without HEPES. The same color plot is shown in Figure 2A. (B) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF containing HEPES buffer. Thick dashed white line shows the time point and potential at which the first analyte was maximal. Thin dashed white line shows the time point at which the second analyte was observed. Current vs. time plots for responses obtained in high K+ aCSF without HEPES (C) (same traces as shown in Figures 2C,E for comparison) compared to aCSF containing HEPES buffer (D). Blue lines show dopamine-like current and black lines show histamine-like current. (E) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thick dashed white line in (B). Circle corresponds to blue line in (D). (F) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thin white line in (B). Circle corresponds to black line in (D).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 5: Comparison of stimulation with high K+ aCSF with- and without HEPES buffer. (A) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF without HEPES. The same color plot is shown in Figure 2A. (B) Color plot showing changes in current evoked by stimulation with high K+ aCSF containing HEPES buffer. Thick dashed white line shows the time point and potential at which the first analyte was maximal. Thin dashed white line shows the time point at which the second analyte was observed. Current vs. time plots for responses obtained in high K+ aCSF without HEPES (C) (same traces as shown in Figures 2C,E for comparison) compared to aCSF containing HEPES buffer (D). Blue lines show dopamine-like current and black lines show histamine-like current. (E) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thick dashed white line in (B). Circle corresponds to blue line in (D). (F) Voltammogram extracted at time point indicated by thin white line in (B). Circle corresponds to black line in (D).
Mentions: We investigated whether a shift in pH could be contributing to the changes in the current that we measured by adding HEPES buffer to the aCSF. Stimulation using high K+ HEPES-buffered aCSF altered the release profile of analytes occurring at the oxidation and reduction potentials for both dopamine and histamine. The large dip normally present at ~10 s after application of high K+ aCSF was reduced (compare Figure 5A and Figure 5C with Figure 5B and Figure 5D). Furthermore, addition of HEPES caused the current to return to baseline following stimulation (Figure 5D) suggesting a less prominent shift in background signal. The resulting voltammogram, taken ~10 s after stimulation, (Figure 5E) no longer showed a large reduction in signal at around +0.2 V which seemed to mask the oxidation peak at +0.6 V in previous experiments (compare to Figures 3A,C). A second cyclic voltammogram taken ~30 s after stimulation showed a small increase in current observed at ~ +0.7 V (Figure 5F).

Bottom Line: In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon.We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain.This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, University of Leicester Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT
The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain.

No MeSH data available.