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Non-mammalian models in behavioral neuroscience: consequences for biological psychiatry.

Maximino C, Silva RX, da Silva Sde N, Rodrigues Ldo S, Barbosa H, de Carvalho TS, Leão LK, Lima MG, Oliveira KR, Herculano AM - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: However, in the same sense that a comparative approach to neuroanatomy allows for the identification of patterns of brain organization, the inclusion of other species and an adoption of comparative viewpoints in behavioral neuroscience could also lead to increases in knowledge relevant to biological psychiatry.To achieve this goal, the current focus on mammalian species must be expanded to include other species, including non-mammalian taxa.In this article, we review behavioral neuroscientific experiments in non-mammalian species, including traditional "model organisms" (zebrafish and Drosophila) as well as in other species which can be used as "reference." The application of these domains in biological psychiatry and their translational relevance is considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Neurociências e Comportamento, Departamento de Morfologia e Ciências Fisiológicas, Campus VIII - Marabá, Universidade do Estado do Pará Marabá, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Current models in biological psychiatry focus on a handful of model species, and the majority of work relies on data generated in rodents. However, in the same sense that a comparative approach to neuroanatomy allows for the identification of patterns of brain organization, the inclusion of other species and an adoption of comparative viewpoints in behavioral neuroscience could also lead to increases in knowledge relevant to biological psychiatry. Specifically, this approach could help to identify conserved features of brain structure and behavior, as well as to understand how variation in gene expression or developmental trajectories relates to variation in brain and behavior pertinent to psychiatric disorders. To achieve this goal, the current focus on mammalian species must be expanded to include other species, including non-mammalian taxa. In this article, we review behavioral neuroscientific experiments in non-mammalian species, including traditional "model organisms" (zebrafish and Drosophila) as well as in other species which can be used as "reference." The application of these domains in biological psychiatry and their translational relevance is considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neuropeptides involved in anxiety disorder in clinical samples (Steckler, 2008). Peptides marked with asteriks (*) have been investigated in goldfish (Carassius auratus) psychomotor activity, anxiety, or feeding assays. AVP, vasopressin; ANP, atrial natriuretic peptide; CCK, cholecystokinin; CRF, corticotropin-releasing factor; DYN, dynorphin; END, β-endorphin; GAD, generalized anxiety disorder; NPY, neuropeptide Y; PD, panic disorder; PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder; SST, somatostatin.
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Figure 2: Neuropeptides involved in anxiety disorder in clinical samples (Steckler, 2008). Peptides marked with asteriks (*) have been investigated in goldfish (Carassius auratus) psychomotor activity, anxiety, or feeding assays. AVP, vasopressin; ANP, atrial natriuretic peptide; CCK, cholecystokinin; CRF, corticotropin-releasing factor; DYN, dynorphin; END, β-endorphin; GAD, generalized anxiety disorder; NPY, neuropeptide Y; PD, panic disorder; PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder; SST, somatostatin.

Mentions: Some hypothalamic regions responsible for stress responses are also involved in food intake, and orexigen and anorexigen peptides produced and secreted from those areas regulate feeding. Some regulatory peptides involved in the organization of energetic homeostasis, such as ghrelin, orexin, galanin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, PACAP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and CRF, modulate different types of behavior after central or peripheral administration in mammals and teleost fish (Matsuda, 2009; Matsuda et al., 2011a). Some of these peptides have been linked to psychiatric disorders in humans (Figure 2). The i.c.v. and intraperitoneal injections of PACAP and VIP inhibits feeding and locomotion in goldfish (Matsuda et al., 2006a); PACAP injections also increase the expression of CRF mRNA in the brain, an effect which is mimicked by excessive feeding (Maruyama et al., 2006). While CRF has been implicated in anxiety and stress (Takahashi, 2001), there is also some evidence for a role in appetite control. CRF injections in the brain, but not in the periphery, is also anorexinogenic in goldfish (De Pedro et al., 1993). However, CRF injections increase locomotion (Maruyama et al., 2006) and produce an anxiogenic-like effect in the novel tank test (Matsuda et al., 2013).


Non-mammalian models in behavioral neuroscience: consequences for biological psychiatry.

Maximino C, Silva RX, da Silva Sde N, Rodrigues Ldo S, Barbosa H, de Carvalho TS, Leão LK, Lima MG, Oliveira KR, Herculano AM - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Neuropeptides involved in anxiety disorder in clinical samples (Steckler, 2008). Peptides marked with asteriks (*) have been investigated in goldfish (Carassius auratus) psychomotor activity, anxiety, or feeding assays. AVP, vasopressin; ANP, atrial natriuretic peptide; CCK, cholecystokinin; CRF, corticotropin-releasing factor; DYN, dynorphin; END, β-endorphin; GAD, generalized anxiety disorder; NPY, neuropeptide Y; PD, panic disorder; PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder; SST, somatostatin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561806&req=5

Figure 2: Neuropeptides involved in anxiety disorder in clinical samples (Steckler, 2008). Peptides marked with asteriks (*) have been investigated in goldfish (Carassius auratus) psychomotor activity, anxiety, or feeding assays. AVP, vasopressin; ANP, atrial natriuretic peptide; CCK, cholecystokinin; CRF, corticotropin-releasing factor; DYN, dynorphin; END, β-endorphin; GAD, generalized anxiety disorder; NPY, neuropeptide Y; PD, panic disorder; PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder; SST, somatostatin.
Mentions: Some hypothalamic regions responsible for stress responses are also involved in food intake, and orexigen and anorexigen peptides produced and secreted from those areas regulate feeding. Some regulatory peptides involved in the organization of energetic homeostasis, such as ghrelin, orexin, galanin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, PACAP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and CRF, modulate different types of behavior after central or peripheral administration in mammals and teleost fish (Matsuda, 2009; Matsuda et al., 2011a). Some of these peptides have been linked to psychiatric disorders in humans (Figure 2). The i.c.v. and intraperitoneal injections of PACAP and VIP inhibits feeding and locomotion in goldfish (Matsuda et al., 2006a); PACAP injections also increase the expression of CRF mRNA in the brain, an effect which is mimicked by excessive feeding (Maruyama et al., 2006). While CRF has been implicated in anxiety and stress (Takahashi, 2001), there is also some evidence for a role in appetite control. CRF injections in the brain, but not in the periphery, is also anorexinogenic in goldfish (De Pedro et al., 1993). However, CRF injections increase locomotion (Maruyama et al., 2006) and produce an anxiogenic-like effect in the novel tank test (Matsuda et al., 2013).

Bottom Line: However, in the same sense that a comparative approach to neuroanatomy allows for the identification of patterns of brain organization, the inclusion of other species and an adoption of comparative viewpoints in behavioral neuroscience could also lead to increases in knowledge relevant to biological psychiatry.To achieve this goal, the current focus on mammalian species must be expanded to include other species, including non-mammalian taxa.In this article, we review behavioral neuroscientific experiments in non-mammalian species, including traditional "model organisms" (zebrafish and Drosophila) as well as in other species which can be used as "reference." The application of these domains in biological psychiatry and their translational relevance is considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Neurociências e Comportamento, Departamento de Morfologia e Ciências Fisiológicas, Campus VIII - Marabá, Universidade do Estado do Pará Marabá, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Current models in biological psychiatry focus on a handful of model species, and the majority of work relies on data generated in rodents. However, in the same sense that a comparative approach to neuroanatomy allows for the identification of patterns of brain organization, the inclusion of other species and an adoption of comparative viewpoints in behavioral neuroscience could also lead to increases in knowledge relevant to biological psychiatry. Specifically, this approach could help to identify conserved features of brain structure and behavior, as well as to understand how variation in gene expression or developmental trajectories relates to variation in brain and behavior pertinent to psychiatric disorders. To achieve this goal, the current focus on mammalian species must be expanded to include other species, including non-mammalian taxa. In this article, we review behavioral neuroscientific experiments in non-mammalian species, including traditional "model organisms" (zebrafish and Drosophila) as well as in other species which can be used as "reference." The application of these domains in biological psychiatry and their translational relevance is considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus