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Effects of Hormone Therapy on Serum Lipid Levels in Postmenopausal Korean Women.

Lee JY, Hyun HS, Park HG, Seo JH, Lee EY, Lee JS, Lee DY, Choi DS, Yoon BK - J Menopausal Med (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no significant change in lipoprotein levels compared to the baseline in transdermal group.There were also no differences with additional MP.The estrogen effects are not influenced by adding MP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study was conducted to examine the effects of hormone therapy on serum lipid levels in postmenopausal Korean women.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 154 healthy postmenopausal Korean women. Seventy-nine women took oral estrogen (conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg/day or equivalent), and 75 applied estrogen transdermally using 0.1% 17β-estradiol gel. Micronized progesterone (MP) was added to 40 women of oral group and 49 women in transdermal group. Serum levels of triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and lipoprotein (a) were measured before, 3 and 6 month after hormone therapy.

Results: At baseline, mean body mass index (BMI) were lower (22.76 vs. 23.74 kg/m(2)) and proportion of family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (61 vs. 39%) were higher in oral group. In oral group, LDL-C and lipoprotein(a) levels decreased, and triglyceride and HDL-C levels increased significantly after 3 and 6 months. There was no significant change in lipoprotein levels compared to the baseline in transdermal group. There were also no differences with additional MP. Changing pattern of HDL-C during 6 months was significantly different by the route of estrogen administration.

Conclusion: Oral estrogen therapy might be more beneficial than transdermal estrogen in terms of lipid in postmenopausal Korean women. The estrogen effects are not influenced by adding MP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. After adjusting for body mass index and family history of cardiovascular disease, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.028). TD: transdermal.
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Figure 1: Change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. After adjusting for body mass index and family history of cardiovascular disease, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.028). TD: transdermal.

Mentions: Table 6 shows the comparison of serum cholesterol levels in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. A significant decrease was found in LDL and lipoprotein (a) levels and a significant increase was detected in triglyceride and HDL levels compared to the baseline levels in oral administration group. On the other hand, no significant change was observed in lipoprotein levels in transdermal administration group. After adjusting BMI and a family history of CVD, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between two groups by administration route (Fig. 1).


Effects of Hormone Therapy on Serum Lipid Levels in Postmenopausal Korean Women.

Lee JY, Hyun HS, Park HG, Seo JH, Lee EY, Lee JS, Lee DY, Choi DS, Yoon BK - J Menopausal Med (2015)

Change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. After adjusting for body mass index and family history of cardiovascular disease, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.028). TD: transdermal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561737&req=5

Figure 1: Change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. After adjusting for body mass index and family history of cardiovascular disease, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.028). TD: transdermal.
Mentions: Table 6 shows the comparison of serum cholesterol levels in whole hormone therapy group by the route of estrogen. A significant decrease was found in LDL and lipoprotein (a) levels and a significant increase was detected in triglyceride and HDL levels compared to the baseline levels in oral administration group. On the other hand, no significant change was observed in lipoprotein levels in transdermal administration group. After adjusting BMI and a family history of CVD, changing pattern of HDL was significantly different between two groups by administration route (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: There was no significant change in lipoprotein levels compared to the baseline in transdermal group.There were also no differences with additional MP.The estrogen effects are not influenced by adding MP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study was conducted to examine the effects of hormone therapy on serum lipid levels in postmenopausal Korean women.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 154 healthy postmenopausal Korean women. Seventy-nine women took oral estrogen (conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg/day or equivalent), and 75 applied estrogen transdermally using 0.1% 17β-estradiol gel. Micronized progesterone (MP) was added to 40 women of oral group and 49 women in transdermal group. Serum levels of triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and lipoprotein (a) were measured before, 3 and 6 month after hormone therapy.

Results: At baseline, mean body mass index (BMI) were lower (22.76 vs. 23.74 kg/m(2)) and proportion of family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (61 vs. 39%) were higher in oral group. In oral group, LDL-C and lipoprotein(a) levels decreased, and triglyceride and HDL-C levels increased significantly after 3 and 6 months. There was no significant change in lipoprotein levels compared to the baseline in transdermal group. There were also no differences with additional MP. Changing pattern of HDL-C during 6 months was significantly different by the route of estrogen administration.

Conclusion: Oral estrogen therapy might be more beneficial than transdermal estrogen in terms of lipid in postmenopausal Korean women. The estrogen effects are not influenced by adding MP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus