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The Enterobacterium Trabulsiella odontotermitis Presents Novel Adaptations Related to Its Association with Fungus-Growing Termites.

Sapountzis P, Gruntjes T, Otani S, Estevez J, da Costa RR, Plunkett G, Perna NT, Poulsen M - Appl. Environ. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Fungus-growing termites rely on symbiotic microorganisms to help break down plant material and to obtain nutrients.Taking diverse approaches, we obtained a solid phylogenetic placement of T. odontotermitis among the Enterobacteriaceae, investigated the physiology and enzymatic profiles of T. odontotermitis isolates, determined the localization of the bacterium in the termite gut, compared draft genomes of two T. odontotermitis isolates to those of their close relatives, and examined the expression of genes relevant to host colonization and putative symbiont functions.Our findings support the hypothesis that T. odontotermitis is a facultative symbiont mainly located in the paunch compartment of the gut, with possible roles in carbohydrate metabolism and aflatoxin degradation, while displaying adaptations to association with the termite host, such as expressing genes for a type VI secretion system which has been demonstrated to assist bacterial competition, colonization, and survival within hosts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Sapountzis@bio.ku.dk.

No MeSH data available.


(A) 16S rRNA gene phylogram for all obtained Trabulsiella odontotermitis isolates and closely related Enterobacteriaceae. Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 500 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50. (B) Phylogenetic tree based on MLST of 10 genes (see the text for details). Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 1,000 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50.
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Figure 1: (A) 16S rRNA gene phylogram for all obtained Trabulsiella odontotermitis isolates and closely related Enterobacteriaceae. Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 500 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50. (B) Phylogenetic tree based on MLST of 10 genes (see the text for details). Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 1,000 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50.

Mentions: Trabulsiella is placed within the Enterobacteriaceae, but previous analysis did not provide sufficient resolution for a solid placement of T. odontotermitis and T. guamensis in a global Enterobacteriaceae phylogeny (Fig. 1A). 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic placement of Trabulsiella confirmed its placement within the Enterobacteriaceae (Fig. 1B) and placed the two T. odontotermitis isolates closest to each other, with T. guamensis being basal to both (Fig. 1B). MLST analysis of 10 housekeeping genes provided strong bootstrap support for the placement of both T. odontotermitis and T. guamensis separate from the other Enterobacteriaceae.


The Enterobacterium Trabulsiella odontotermitis Presents Novel Adaptations Related to Its Association with Fungus-Growing Termites.

Sapountzis P, Gruntjes T, Otani S, Estevez J, da Costa RR, Plunkett G, Perna NT, Poulsen M - Appl. Environ. Microbiol. (2015)

(A) 16S rRNA gene phylogram for all obtained Trabulsiella odontotermitis isolates and closely related Enterobacteriaceae. Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 500 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50. (B) Phylogenetic tree based on MLST of 10 genes (see the text for details). Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 1,000 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561680&req=5

Figure 1: (A) 16S rRNA gene phylogram for all obtained Trabulsiella odontotermitis isolates and closely related Enterobacteriaceae. Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 500 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50. (B) Phylogenetic tree based on MLST of 10 genes (see the text for details). Bootstrap support values for neighbor-joining (above branches) and maximum likelihood (below branches) conditions and 1,000 pseudoreplicates are given for nodes with support values of >50.
Mentions: Trabulsiella is placed within the Enterobacteriaceae, but previous analysis did not provide sufficient resolution for a solid placement of T. odontotermitis and T. guamensis in a global Enterobacteriaceae phylogeny (Fig. 1A). 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic placement of Trabulsiella confirmed its placement within the Enterobacteriaceae (Fig. 1B) and placed the two T. odontotermitis isolates closest to each other, with T. guamensis being basal to both (Fig. 1B). MLST analysis of 10 housekeeping genes provided strong bootstrap support for the placement of both T. odontotermitis and T. guamensis separate from the other Enterobacteriaceae.

Bottom Line: Fungus-growing termites rely on symbiotic microorganisms to help break down plant material and to obtain nutrients.Taking diverse approaches, we obtained a solid phylogenetic placement of T. odontotermitis among the Enterobacteriaceae, investigated the physiology and enzymatic profiles of T. odontotermitis isolates, determined the localization of the bacterium in the termite gut, compared draft genomes of two T. odontotermitis isolates to those of their close relatives, and examined the expression of genes relevant to host colonization and putative symbiont functions.Our findings support the hypothesis that T. odontotermitis is a facultative symbiont mainly located in the paunch compartment of the gut, with possible roles in carbohydrate metabolism and aflatoxin degradation, while displaying adaptations to association with the termite host, such as expressing genes for a type VI secretion system which has been demonstrated to assist bacterial competition, colonization, and survival within hosts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Sapountzis@bio.ku.dk.

No MeSH data available.