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Vector and reservoir control for preventing leishmaniasis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Leishmaniasis is caused by the Leishmania parasite, and transmitted by infected phlebotomine sandflies. Of the two distinct clinical syndromes, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) affects the skin and mucous membranes, and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) affects internal organs. Approaches to prevent transmission include vector control by reducing human contact with infected sandflies, and reservoir control, by reducing the number of infected animals.

Objectives: To assess the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions for cutaneous and for visceral leishmaniasis.

Search methods: We searched the following databases to 13 January 2015: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and WHOLIS, Web of Science, and RePORTER. We also searched trials registers for ongoing trials.

Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions in leishmaniasis-endemic regions.

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently searched for trials and extracted data from included RCTs. We resolved any disagreements by discussion with a third review author. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results: We included 14 RCTs that evaluated a range of interventions across different settings. The study methods were generally poorly described, and consequently all included trials were judged to be at high or unclear risk of selection and reporting bias. Only seven trials reported clinical outcome data which limits our ability to make broad generalizations to different epidemiological settings and cultures.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis"/>

Comparison 6 Reservoir control versus no intervention, Outcome 1 Serconversion (Montenegro Skin Test).
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d35e11606: Comparison 6 Reservoir control versus no intervention, Outcome 1 Serconversion (Montenegro Skin Test).


Vector and reservoir control for preventing leishmaniasis
Comparison 6 Reservoir control versus no intervention, Outcome 1 Serconversion (Montenegro Skin Test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561525&req=5

d35e11606: Comparison 6 Reservoir control versus no intervention, Outcome 1 Serconversion (Montenegro Skin Test).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Leishmaniasis is caused by the Leishmania parasite, and transmitted by infected phlebotomine sandflies. Of the two distinct clinical syndromes, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) affects the skin and mucous membranes, and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) affects internal organs. Approaches to prevent transmission include vector control by reducing human contact with infected sandflies, and reservoir control, by reducing the number of infected animals.

Objectives: To assess the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions for cutaneous and for visceral leishmaniasis.

Search methods: We searched the following databases to 13 January 2015: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and WHOLIS, Web of Science, and RePORTER. We also searched trials registers for ongoing trials.

Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions in leishmaniasis-endemic regions.

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently searched for trials and extracted data from included RCTs. We resolved any disagreements by discussion with a third review author. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results: We included 14 RCTs that evaluated a range of interventions across different settings. The study methods were generally poorly described, and consequently all included trials were judged to be at high or unclear risk of selection and reporting bias. Only seven trials reported clinical outcome data which limits our ability to make broad generalizations to different epidemiological settings and cultures.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis"/>