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From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial: Copper Alloy Surfaces Kill Bacteria and Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections.

Michels HT, Keevil CW, Salgado CD, Schmidt MG - HERD (2015)

Bottom Line: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces.Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests.Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Copper Development Association, New York, NY, USA harold.michels@copperalliance.us.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of healthcare-associated infection versus microbial burden measured in the intensive care unit rooms during the patient stay (Salgado et al., 2013).
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fig5-1937586715592650: Distribution of healthcare-associated infection versus microbial burden measured in the intensive care unit rooms during the patient stay (Salgado et al., 2013).

Mentions: It should be noted that a high-level statistical significance was achieved, as indicated by the low p value of .013 (Salgado et al., 2013). Thus, the infection reduction of 58% was achieved by introducing six copper components into the copper rooms. It should be noted that the six copper components comprised less than 10% of the surface area of the room. This 58% reduction in HAIs is seen as a strong testament to the ability of antimicrobial copper surfaces to continuously kill bacteria in the clinical setting between routine cleanings. Note the relationship between microbial burden and risk of HAIs shown in Figure 5. It illustrates that the risk of acquiring an infection increases as microbial burden increases, or dirty surfaces favor acquiring an infection. It applies to all rooms, both copper and noncopper, and is statistically significant (p = .038). The cumulative microbial burden was lower in the rooms containing the copper components. Only 17% of the total 4,450,545 CFUs of bacteria were recovered from the copper surfaces. This is consistent with the infection reduction in the copper rooms, in that a lower microbial burden was observed on the copper components relative to the noncopper components.


From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial: Copper Alloy Surfaces Kill Bacteria and Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections.

Michels HT, Keevil CW, Salgado CD, Schmidt MG - HERD (2015)

Distribution of healthcare-associated infection versus microbial burden measured in the intensive care unit rooms during the patient stay (Salgado et al., 2013).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561453&req=5

fig5-1937586715592650: Distribution of healthcare-associated infection versus microbial burden measured in the intensive care unit rooms during the patient stay (Salgado et al., 2013).
Mentions: It should be noted that a high-level statistical significance was achieved, as indicated by the low p value of .013 (Salgado et al., 2013). Thus, the infection reduction of 58% was achieved by introducing six copper components into the copper rooms. It should be noted that the six copper components comprised less than 10% of the surface area of the room. This 58% reduction in HAIs is seen as a strong testament to the ability of antimicrobial copper surfaces to continuously kill bacteria in the clinical setting between routine cleanings. Note the relationship between microbial burden and risk of HAIs shown in Figure 5. It illustrates that the risk of acquiring an infection increases as microbial burden increases, or dirty surfaces favor acquiring an infection. It applies to all rooms, both copper and noncopper, and is statistically significant (p = .038). The cumulative microbial burden was lower in the rooms containing the copper components. Only 17% of the total 4,450,545 CFUs of bacteria were recovered from the copper surfaces. This is consistent with the infection reduction in the copper rooms, in that a lower microbial burden was observed on the copper components relative to the noncopper components.

Bottom Line: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces.Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests.Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Copper Development Association, New York, NY, USA harold.michels@copperalliance.us.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus