Limits...
The relation between celiac disease, nonceliac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome.

El-Salhy M, Hatlebakk JG, Gilja OH, Hausken T - Nutr J (2015)

Bottom Line: CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS.The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients.It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Stord Hospital, Stord, Norway. magdy.el-salhy@helse-fonna.no.

ABSTRACT
Wheat products make a substantial contribution to the dietary intake of many people worldwide. Despite the many beneficial aspects of consuming wheat products, it is also responsible for several diseases such as celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS. Therefore, CD should be excluded in IBS patients. A considerable proportion of CD patients suffer from IBS symptoms despite adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients. It is not clear that gluten triggers the symptoms in NCGS, but there is compelling evidence that carbohydrates (fructans and galactans) in wheat does. It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Duodenal cholecystokinin cells in (a) a healthy subject, a patient with CD (b), and (c) a patient with IBS
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561431&req=5

Fig2: Duodenal cholecystokinin cells in (a) a healthy subject, a patient with CD (b), and (c) a patient with IBS

Mentions: Abnormalities in the densities of the various types of endocrine cells in the small intestine have been reported in both IBS and CD (Table 2 and Figs. 1, 2 and 3) [60–78], and these abnormalities are considered to play an important role in the symptom development in both of these diseases [63, 79–81]. The pattern of changes in the densities of small-intestine endocrine cells in patients with CD is quite different from that in IBS and postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS).Table 2


The relation between celiac disease, nonceliac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome.

El-Salhy M, Hatlebakk JG, Gilja OH, Hausken T - Nutr J (2015)

Duodenal cholecystokinin cells in (a) a healthy subject, a patient with CD (b), and (c) a patient with IBS
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561431&req=5

Fig2: Duodenal cholecystokinin cells in (a) a healthy subject, a patient with CD (b), and (c) a patient with IBS
Mentions: Abnormalities in the densities of the various types of endocrine cells in the small intestine have been reported in both IBS and CD (Table 2 and Figs. 1, 2 and 3) [60–78], and these abnormalities are considered to play an important role in the symptom development in both of these diseases [63, 79–81]. The pattern of changes in the densities of small-intestine endocrine cells in patients with CD is quite different from that in IBS and postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS).Table 2

Bottom Line: CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS.The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients.It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Stord Hospital, Stord, Norway. magdy.el-salhy@helse-fonna.no.

ABSTRACT
Wheat products make a substantial contribution to the dietary intake of many people worldwide. Despite the many beneficial aspects of consuming wheat products, it is also responsible for several diseases such as celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in CD patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS. Therefore, CD should be excluded in IBS patients. A considerable proportion of CD patients suffer from IBS symptoms despite adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some CD patients. It is not clear that gluten triggers the symptoms in NCGS, but there is compelling evidence that carbohydrates (fructans and galactans) in wheat does. It is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat by adhering to a GFD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus