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A study of the immediate effects of glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses and flat insoles on single-leg balance, gait patterns and perceived comfort in healthy adults.

Hatton AL, Hug F, Brown BC, Green LP, Hughes JR, King J, Orgar EJ, Surman K, Vicenzino B - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Bottom Line: This study compared the immediate effects of wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, and flat insoles, on balance and gait measures.Perceived comfort may be related to the biomechanical or clinical effectiveness of novel footwear interventions, and requires further investigation.Importantly, these findings are specific to a healthy population and further research is needed to determine the long-term effects of glycerine-filled insoles in patients with known balance impairments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Therapies Building (84A), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Footwear interventions are often prescribed to assist with the management of lower limb pain, injury and disease. Commercially available shoe insoles and orthoses are increasingly incorporating novel design features to alleviate foot and lower limb symptoms, but this may be at a cost to optimal functional performance. This study compared the immediate effects of wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, and flat insoles, on balance and gait measures.

Methods: Thirty healthy adults (17 men, 13 women; mean [SD] age: 24.3 [2.5] years) performed tests of single-leg standing with eyes open (Kistler force platform), star excursion balance test, and level-ground walking (GAITRite® walkway system), under three randomised conditions: wearing glycerine-filled insoles, prefabricated orthoses, and flat (control) insoles, within their own footwear. Centre of pressure movement (anterior-posterior and mediolateral range and standard deviation, total path velocity), star excursion balance test reach distance, and temporospatial gait variables were collected. Perceived comfort of the inserts was scored immediately after use on a 100 mm visual analogue rating scale. After trialling all inserts each participant ranked their level of comfort from least to most.

Results: Centre of pressure measures, star excursion balance test reach distance, or temporospatial gait variables did not differ between the three inserts (all P values >0.088). Significant between-condition differences were reported for comfort ranking (P = 0.031), but not rating scores (P = 0.638). Weak to moderate negative correlations (r values ranged between -0.368 and -0.406) were observed between visual analogue scale comfort rating for the flat insoles and prefabricated orthoses, star excursion balance test and gait measures.

Conclusions: Single-leg standing balance, star excursion balance test performance, and level-ground walking patterns in asymptomatic adults do not appear to differ when wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, or flat insoles. Perceived comfort may be related to the biomechanical or clinical effectiveness of novel footwear interventions, and requires further investigation. Importantly, these findings are specific to a healthy population and further research is needed to determine the long-term effects of glycerine-filled insoles in patients with known balance impairments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Perceived comfort ranking scores for the shoe inserts. Number and percentage of participants who ranked each insert from least to most comfortable, upon completion of all test procedures
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Fig1: Perceived comfort ranking scores for the shoe inserts. Number and percentage of participants who ranked each insert from least to most comfortable, upon completion of all test procedures

Mentions: Frequency analyses indicated that the flat insoles were most commonly ranked as the ‘most comfortable’ condition (N = 15), with the glycerine-filled insole most commonly reported to be ‘least comfortable’ (N = 13) (Fig. 1). Chi square test indicated that differences in comfort ranking scores between the three insert conditions were statistically significant (χ2 [4, N = 30] = 10.600, P = 0.031). Mean (SD) VAS comfort rating scores were 53.4 (23.2) mm (flat, control insole), 48.2 (23.6) mm (glycerine-filled insole) and 51.8 (24.7) mm (prefabricated orthosis), respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA reported no significant between-condition differences in VAS comfort ratings (F (2,58) = 0.453, P = 0.638). A significant, but weak correlation was observed between VAS rating scores for the flat insole with double-limb support time (left leg) during level-ground walking (r = −0.398, P = 0.029). Similarly, weak to moderate associations were reported between the prefabricated orthosis and posterior reach distance during the SEBT (r = −0.406, P = 0.026) and toe in/out angle during walking (r = −0.368, P = 0.045).Fig. 1


A study of the immediate effects of glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses and flat insoles on single-leg balance, gait patterns and perceived comfort in healthy adults.

Hatton AL, Hug F, Brown BC, Green LP, Hughes JR, King J, Orgar EJ, Surman K, Vicenzino B - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Perceived comfort ranking scores for the shoe inserts. Number and percentage of participants who ranked each insert from least to most comfortable, upon completion of all test procedures
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4561414&req=5

Fig1: Perceived comfort ranking scores for the shoe inserts. Number and percentage of participants who ranked each insert from least to most comfortable, upon completion of all test procedures
Mentions: Frequency analyses indicated that the flat insoles were most commonly ranked as the ‘most comfortable’ condition (N = 15), with the glycerine-filled insole most commonly reported to be ‘least comfortable’ (N = 13) (Fig. 1). Chi square test indicated that differences in comfort ranking scores between the three insert conditions were statistically significant (χ2 [4, N = 30] = 10.600, P = 0.031). Mean (SD) VAS comfort rating scores were 53.4 (23.2) mm (flat, control insole), 48.2 (23.6) mm (glycerine-filled insole) and 51.8 (24.7) mm (prefabricated orthosis), respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA reported no significant between-condition differences in VAS comfort ratings (F (2,58) = 0.453, P = 0.638). A significant, but weak correlation was observed between VAS rating scores for the flat insole with double-limb support time (left leg) during level-ground walking (r = −0.398, P = 0.029). Similarly, weak to moderate associations were reported between the prefabricated orthosis and posterior reach distance during the SEBT (r = −0.406, P = 0.026) and toe in/out angle during walking (r = −0.368, P = 0.045).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This study compared the immediate effects of wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, and flat insoles, on balance and gait measures.Perceived comfort may be related to the biomechanical or clinical effectiveness of novel footwear interventions, and requires further investigation.Importantly, these findings are specific to a healthy population and further research is needed to determine the long-term effects of glycerine-filled insoles in patients with known balance impairments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Therapies Building (84A), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Footwear interventions are often prescribed to assist with the management of lower limb pain, injury and disease. Commercially available shoe insoles and orthoses are increasingly incorporating novel design features to alleviate foot and lower limb symptoms, but this may be at a cost to optimal functional performance. This study compared the immediate effects of wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, and flat insoles, on balance and gait measures.

Methods: Thirty healthy adults (17 men, 13 women; mean [SD] age: 24.3 [2.5] years) performed tests of single-leg standing with eyes open (Kistler force platform), star excursion balance test, and level-ground walking (GAITRite® walkway system), under three randomised conditions: wearing glycerine-filled insoles, prefabricated orthoses, and flat (control) insoles, within their own footwear. Centre of pressure movement (anterior-posterior and mediolateral range and standard deviation, total path velocity), star excursion balance test reach distance, and temporospatial gait variables were collected. Perceived comfort of the inserts was scored immediately after use on a 100 mm visual analogue rating scale. After trialling all inserts each participant ranked their level of comfort from least to most.

Results: Centre of pressure measures, star excursion balance test reach distance, or temporospatial gait variables did not differ between the three inserts (all P values >0.088). Significant between-condition differences were reported for comfort ranking (P = 0.031), but not rating scores (P = 0.638). Weak to moderate negative correlations (r values ranged between -0.368 and -0.406) were observed between visual analogue scale comfort rating for the flat insoles and prefabricated orthoses, star excursion balance test and gait measures.

Conclusions: Single-leg standing balance, star excursion balance test performance, and level-ground walking patterns in asymptomatic adults do not appear to differ when wearing glycerine-filled insoles, contoured prefabricated orthoses, or flat insoles. Perceived comfort may be related to the biomechanical or clinical effectiveness of novel footwear interventions, and requires further investigation. Importantly, these findings are specific to a healthy population and further research is needed to determine the long-term effects of glycerine-filled insoles in patients with known balance impairments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus