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Association of Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Ozone with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: However, evidence of the association is very limited, and no study has estimated the effects of ozone.Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X. 2015.Association of atmospheric particulate matter and ozone with gestational diabetes mellitus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ambient air pollution has been linked to the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, evidence of the association is very limited, and no study has estimated the effects of ozone.

Objective: Our aim was to determine the association of prenatal exposures to particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) with GDM.

Methods: We used Florida birth vital statistics records to investigate the association between the risk of GDM and two air pollutants (PM2.5 and O3) among 410,267 women who gave birth in Florida between 2004 and 2005. Individual air pollution exposure was assessed at the woman's home address at time of delivery using the hierarchical Bayesian space-time statistical model. We further estimated associations between air pollution exposures during different trimesters and GDM.

Results: After controlling for nine covariates, we observed increased odds of GDM with per 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (ORTrimester1 = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.21; ORTrimester2 = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.20; ORPregnancy = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.26) and per 5-ppb increase in O3 (ORTrimester1 = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.11; ORTrimester2 = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.14; ORPregnancy = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.21) during both the first trimester and second trimester as well as the full pregnancy in single-pollutant models. Compared with the single-pollutant model, the ORs for O3 were almost identical in the co-pollutant model. However, the ORs for PM2.5 during the first trimester and the full pregnancy were attenuated, and no association was observed for PM2.5 during the second trimester in the co-pollutant model (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.07).

Conclusion: This population-based study suggests that exposure to air pollution during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of GDM in Florida, USA.

Citation: Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X. 2015. Association of atmospheric particulate matter and ozone with gestational diabetes mellitus. Environ Health Perspect 123:853-859; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408456.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted log(OR) for risk of GDM with per 5 units increase in gestational exposure to pollutant for single- and co-pollutant models among women who gave birth in 2004–2005 in Florida, USA. Diamonds reflect the central estimate; whiskers represent the 95% CIs.
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f1: Adjusted log(OR) for risk of GDM with per 5 units increase in gestational exposure to pollutant for single- and co-pollutant models among women who gave birth in 2004–2005 in Florida, USA. Diamonds reflect the central estimate; whiskers represent the 95% CIs.

Mentions: The results of the co-pollutant models are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S6. Figure 1 compares the results obtained from single- and co-pollutant continuous models. The ORs for O3 after adjusting for PM2.5 were almost identical to the ORs from the single-pollutant model. However, the ORs for PM2.5 during the first trimester and the full pregnancy attenuated after adjusting for O3, and no association was observed for PM2.5 during the second trimester in the co-pollutant model (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 compared with OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.20 from the single-pollutant model).


Association of Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Ozone with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Adjusted log(OR) for risk of GDM with per 5 units increase in gestational exposure to pollutant for single- and co-pollutant models among women who gave birth in 2004–2005 in Florida, USA. Diamonds reflect the central estimate; whiskers represent the 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559952&req=5

f1: Adjusted log(OR) for risk of GDM with per 5 units increase in gestational exposure to pollutant for single- and co-pollutant models among women who gave birth in 2004–2005 in Florida, USA. Diamonds reflect the central estimate; whiskers represent the 95% CIs.
Mentions: The results of the co-pollutant models are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S6. Figure 1 compares the results obtained from single- and co-pollutant continuous models. The ORs for O3 after adjusting for PM2.5 were almost identical to the ORs from the single-pollutant model. However, the ORs for PM2.5 during the first trimester and the full pregnancy attenuated after adjusting for O3, and no association was observed for PM2.5 during the second trimester in the co-pollutant model (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 compared with OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.20 from the single-pollutant model).

Bottom Line: However, evidence of the association is very limited, and no study has estimated the effects of ozone.Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X. 2015.Association of atmospheric particulate matter and ozone with gestational diabetes mellitus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ambient air pollution has been linked to the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, evidence of the association is very limited, and no study has estimated the effects of ozone.

Objective: Our aim was to determine the association of prenatal exposures to particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) with GDM.

Methods: We used Florida birth vital statistics records to investigate the association between the risk of GDM and two air pollutants (PM2.5 and O3) among 410,267 women who gave birth in Florida between 2004 and 2005. Individual air pollution exposure was assessed at the woman's home address at time of delivery using the hierarchical Bayesian space-time statistical model. We further estimated associations between air pollution exposures during different trimesters and GDM.

Results: After controlling for nine covariates, we observed increased odds of GDM with per 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (ORTrimester1 = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.21; ORTrimester2 = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.20; ORPregnancy = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.26) and per 5-ppb increase in O3 (ORTrimester1 = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.11; ORTrimester2 = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.14; ORPregnancy = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.21) during both the first trimester and second trimester as well as the full pregnancy in single-pollutant models. Compared with the single-pollutant model, the ORs for O3 were almost identical in the co-pollutant model. However, the ORs for PM2.5 during the first trimester and the full pregnancy were attenuated, and no association was observed for PM2.5 during the second trimester in the co-pollutant model (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.07).

Conclusion: This population-based study suggests that exposure to air pollution during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of GDM in Florida, USA.

Citation: Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X. 2015. Association of atmospheric particulate matter and ozone with gestational diabetes mellitus. Environ Health Perspect 123:853-859; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408456.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus