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After the Fall: Gastrointestinal Illness following Downpours.

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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In this issue of EHP, researchers report that emergency room visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses increased after heavy rainfalls in areas of Massachusetts served by combined sewer systems, offering evidence that CSOs may adversely affect human health... The Swedish team suspected that pathogens in drinking water caused at least some of the callers’ GI symptoms... They did not track water contaminants themselves but suggested CSOs could be related... The third included 9 towns with modern “separate” sewer systems that transported sewage independently of storm runoff... During the study period, 18 extreme rainfalls occurred, defined as the 99th percentile or greater—this equated to 1.33, 1.60, and 1.97 inches of rain per event at the three sites, respectively... In towns where CSOs flowed into the Merrimack River emergency room visits increased by an average 13% for all ages and an average 32% for people older than 65 years about a week after extreme rainfalls... In comparison, no unusual rise in visits occurred at hospitals in towns that did not have combined sewer systems or where CSOs were discharged into recreational waters. “More heavy, sporadic rainfalls are predicted as climate changes,” says first author Jyotsna Jagai, an epidemiologist at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “Our findings suggest that drinking water quality may be adversely impacted by the presence of CSOs that discharge into drinking water sources after heavy rainfall, although we did not directly measure water quality,” Jagai says... Fixing the problem requires building expensive, new infrastructure to handle sewage and runoff separately. “Many people take water and wastewater infrastructure for granted... Jagai’s study highlights the importance of investing in our aging water infrastructure, especially in the face of climate change,” says Karen Levy, an assistant professor at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health... Levy did not participate in the study... Jagai plans to collect agency data on CSO releases to further assess emergency room visits soon after reported events in Midwestern cities... This will allow the researchers to look for associations between known CSOs and GI illness, rather than use heavy rainfall as a predictor of CSO events... Future results “could be bolstered by water quality studies to identify when water contamination hits a tipping point that may have health effects,” Levy says. “This could help to devise monitoring programs and early warning systems for actions such as advisories for the public to boil water. ”

No MeSH data available.


Combined sewer systems use the same pipe to route stormwater and sewage to a wastewater treatment plant. These systems are designed to discharge excess flow into a nearby water body. Modern separate sewer systems route sewage to a treatment plant via one pipe while another directs untreated stormwater into water bodies.EHP
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d35e108: Combined sewer systems use the same pipe to route stormwater and sewage to a wastewater treatment plant. These systems are designed to discharge excess flow into a nearby water body. Modern separate sewer systems route sewage to a treatment plant via one pipe while another directs untreated stormwater into water bodies.EHP


After the Fall: Gastrointestinal Illness following Downpours.

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Combined sewer systems use the same pipe to route stormwater and sewage to a wastewater treatment plant. These systems are designed to discharge excess flow into a nearby water body. Modern separate sewer systems route sewage to a treatment plant via one pipe while another directs untreated stormwater into water bodies.EHP
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559948&req=5

d35e108: Combined sewer systems use the same pipe to route stormwater and sewage to a wastewater treatment plant. These systems are designed to discharge excess flow into a nearby water body. Modern separate sewer systems route sewage to a treatment plant via one pipe while another directs untreated stormwater into water bodies.EHP

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

In this issue of EHP, researchers report that emergency room visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses increased after heavy rainfalls in areas of Massachusetts served by combined sewer systems, offering evidence that CSOs may adversely affect human health... The Swedish team suspected that pathogens in drinking water caused at least some of the callers’ GI symptoms... They did not track water contaminants themselves but suggested CSOs could be related... The third included 9 towns with modern “separate” sewer systems that transported sewage independently of storm runoff... During the study period, 18 extreme rainfalls occurred, defined as the 99th percentile or greater—this equated to 1.33, 1.60, and 1.97 inches of rain per event at the three sites, respectively... In towns where CSOs flowed into the Merrimack River emergency room visits increased by an average 13% for all ages and an average 32% for people older than 65 years about a week after extreme rainfalls... In comparison, no unusual rise in visits occurred at hospitals in towns that did not have combined sewer systems or where CSOs were discharged into recreational waters. “More heavy, sporadic rainfalls are predicted as climate changes,” says first author Jyotsna Jagai, an epidemiologist at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “Our findings suggest that drinking water quality may be adversely impacted by the presence of CSOs that discharge into drinking water sources after heavy rainfall, although we did not directly measure water quality,” Jagai says... Fixing the problem requires building expensive, new infrastructure to handle sewage and runoff separately. “Many people take water and wastewater infrastructure for granted... Jagai’s study highlights the importance of investing in our aging water infrastructure, especially in the face of climate change,” says Karen Levy, an assistant professor at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health... Levy did not participate in the study... Jagai plans to collect agency data on CSO releases to further assess emergency room visits soon after reported events in Midwestern cities... This will allow the researchers to look for associations between known CSOs and GI illness, rather than use heavy rainfall as a predictor of CSO events... Future results “could be bolstered by water quality studies to identify when water contamination hits a tipping point that may have health effects,” Levy says. “This could help to devise monitoring programs and early warning systems for actions such as advisories for the public to boil water. ”

No MeSH data available.