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Cross cultural translation, adaptation and reliability of the Malay version of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS).

Nathan AM, Zaki R, Rozario R, Dhania N, Mohd Hamirudin SN, Eg KP, Kee SY, Teh C, Jabar KA, Westerhout C, Thavagnanam S, de Bruyne J - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Bottom Line: The test-retest reliability analysis had a minimum and maximum intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.63 and 0.97 respectively.Clinically, the longer patients were admitted, the lower the severity score (r = -0.35, p < 0.05), indicating that they were getting better.Parent-centred questionnaires are useful and should be an adjunct to other methods, in monitoring response to treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, University Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. psr9900@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) is a parent-proxy questionnaire that assesses severity of acute respiratory infections in children. The aim was to (a) perform a cross-cultural adaptation and (b) prove that the Malay CARIFS is a reliable tool.

Findings: The CARIFS underwent forward and backward translations as recommended by international guidelines. A pilot study was performed on the harmonised version and the final version of the Malay version of CARIFS was produced. A test-retest, 1 h apart, was then performed on parents with children less than 13 years old, admitted with a respiratory tract infection. Parents of children with asthma and who were not eloquent in Malay, were excluded. The data was analysed for consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and reliability (test-retest co-efficient). Thirty-three parents were recruited. Children were aged median (IQR) 6 (2.8, 13.3) months with a male: female ratio of 22:11 and 88% were Malays. Parents were interviewed at median (IQR) 6 (3, 11.5) days of admission. The Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.70 for all items. The test-retest reliability analysis had a minimum and maximum intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.63 and 0.97 respectively. Clinically, the longer patients were admitted, the lower the severity score (r = -0.35, p < 0.05), indicating that they were getting better.

Conclusion: The Malay version of CARIFS is a valid and reliable tool to determine severity of respiratory illness in children. Parent-centred questionnaires are useful and should be an adjunct to other methods, in monitoring response to treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Method of translation of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) from English to Malay
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Fig1: Method of translation of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) from English to Malay

Mentions: The English version of the CARIFS underwent 2 forward and 2 backward translations by native language speakers (medical and non-medical), bilingual in both English and Malay, as shown in Fig. 1. Translations were tabulated and a round table discussion was held to reconcile issues with certain words, especially concerning cultural impact, an important aspect when adapting a questionnaire (Additional file 2). Six randomly selected parents of patients admitted with acute respiratory infections pilot tested the final harmonised version. Results are shown in Additional file 3. The final version of the questionnaire was then used in the test-re-test population (Additional file 4).Fig. 1


Cross cultural translation, adaptation and reliability of the Malay version of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS).

Nathan AM, Zaki R, Rozario R, Dhania N, Mohd Hamirudin SN, Eg KP, Kee SY, Teh C, Jabar KA, Westerhout C, Thavagnanam S, de Bruyne J - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Method of translation of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) from English to Malay
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559942&req=5

Fig1: Method of translation of the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) from English to Malay
Mentions: The English version of the CARIFS underwent 2 forward and 2 backward translations by native language speakers (medical and non-medical), bilingual in both English and Malay, as shown in Fig. 1. Translations were tabulated and a round table discussion was held to reconcile issues with certain words, especially concerning cultural impact, an important aspect when adapting a questionnaire (Additional file 2). Six randomly selected parents of patients admitted with acute respiratory infections pilot tested the final harmonised version. Results are shown in Additional file 3. The final version of the questionnaire was then used in the test-re-test population (Additional file 4).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The test-retest reliability analysis had a minimum and maximum intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.63 and 0.97 respectively.Clinically, the longer patients were admitted, the lower the severity score (r = -0.35, p < 0.05), indicating that they were getting better.Parent-centred questionnaires are useful and should be an adjunct to other methods, in monitoring response to treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, University Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. psr9900@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) is a parent-proxy questionnaire that assesses severity of acute respiratory infections in children. The aim was to (a) perform a cross-cultural adaptation and (b) prove that the Malay CARIFS is a reliable tool.

Findings: The CARIFS underwent forward and backward translations as recommended by international guidelines. A pilot study was performed on the harmonised version and the final version of the Malay version of CARIFS was produced. A test-retest, 1 h apart, was then performed on parents with children less than 13 years old, admitted with a respiratory tract infection. Parents of children with asthma and who were not eloquent in Malay, were excluded. The data was analysed for consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and reliability (test-retest co-efficient). Thirty-three parents were recruited. Children were aged median (IQR) 6 (2.8, 13.3) months with a male: female ratio of 22:11 and 88% were Malays. Parents were interviewed at median (IQR) 6 (3, 11.5) days of admission. The Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.70 for all items. The test-retest reliability analysis had a minimum and maximum intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.63 and 0.97 respectively. Clinically, the longer patients were admitted, the lower the severity score (r = -0.35, p < 0.05), indicating that they were getting better.

Conclusion: The Malay version of CARIFS is a valid and reliable tool to determine severity of respiratory illness in children. Parent-centred questionnaires are useful and should be an adjunct to other methods, in monitoring response to treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus