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Finite element method analysis of the periodontal ligament in mandibular canine movement with transparent tooth correction treatment.

Cai Y, Yang X, He B, Yao J - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The relative maximum von Mises and principal stresses were mainly found at the cervix of the PDL in the translation and inclination cases.The stress and displacement value rapidly decreased in the first few steps and then reached a plateau.Canine's movement type significantly influences the distribution of canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China. caiyongqing33@126.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study used the 3D finite element method to investigate canine's displacements and stresses in the canine's periodontal ligament (PDL) during canine's translation, inclination, and rotation with transparent tooth correction treatment.

Methods: Finite element models were developed to simulate dynamic orthodontic treatments of the translation, inclination, and rotation of the left mandibular canine with transparent tooth correction system. Piecewise static simulations were performed to replicate the dynamic process of orthodontic treatments. The distribution and change trends of canine's displacements and stresses in the canine's PDL during the three types of tooth movements were obtained.

Results: Maximum displacements were observed at the crown and middle part in the translation case, at the crown in the inclination case, and at the crown and root part in the rotation case. The relative maximum von Mises and principal stresses were mainly found at the cervix of the PDL in the translation and inclination cases. In the translation case, tensile stress was mainly observed on the mesial and distal surfaces near the lingual side and compressive stress was located at the bottom of the labial surface. In the inclination case, tensile stress was mainly observed at the labial cervix and lingual apex and compressive stress was located at the lingual cervix and labial apex. In the rotation case, von Mises stress was mainly located at the cervix and inside the lingual surface, tensile stress was located on the distal surface, and compressive stress was detected on the mesial surface. The stress and displacement value rapidly decreased in the first few steps and then reached a plateau.

Conclusions: Canine's movement type significantly influences the distribution of canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL. Changes in canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL were exponential in transparent tooth correction treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Finite element model of mandibular tissue, Aligner (a), Dentition (b), periodontal ligament (c), mandible (d), the assemble model (e), load and boundary condition (f)
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Fig1: Finite element model of mandibular tissue, Aligner (a), Dentition (b), periodontal ligament (c), mandible (d), the assemble model (e), load and boundary condition (f)

Mentions: The FE models of mandibular tissues established in our previous investigations were used in the current study [30]. The 3D FE models (Fig. 1), which comprise mandibular anterior teeth, PDL, and alveolar bone, were developed according to the sequential computed tomography (CT, Philips/Brilliance64) images (0.5 mm intervals) of the normal craniofacial of one volunteer. The geometry of the mandible and dental models were reconstructed with the MIMICS (Materialise) and Geomagic Studio (Geomagic) software. The teeth were translationally moved slightly by using the 3-matic (Materialise) software to eliminate contact between the teeth. The 0.25 mm-thick layers around the tooth root were created to represent the PDL, as indicated in previous studies [30, 36–38]. Finally, the constructed models were imported to the FE software ABAQUS for further analysis.Fig. 1


Finite element method analysis of the periodontal ligament in mandibular canine movement with transparent tooth correction treatment.

Cai Y, Yang X, He B, Yao J - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Finite element model of mandibular tissue, Aligner (a), Dentition (b), periodontal ligament (c), mandible (d), the assemble model (e), load and boundary condition (f)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559922&req=5

Fig1: Finite element model of mandibular tissue, Aligner (a), Dentition (b), periodontal ligament (c), mandible (d), the assemble model (e), load and boundary condition (f)
Mentions: The FE models of mandibular tissues established in our previous investigations were used in the current study [30]. The 3D FE models (Fig. 1), which comprise mandibular anterior teeth, PDL, and alveolar bone, were developed according to the sequential computed tomography (CT, Philips/Brilliance64) images (0.5 mm intervals) of the normal craniofacial of one volunteer. The geometry of the mandible and dental models were reconstructed with the MIMICS (Materialise) and Geomagic Studio (Geomagic) software. The teeth were translationally moved slightly by using the 3-matic (Materialise) software to eliminate contact between the teeth. The 0.25 mm-thick layers around the tooth root were created to represent the PDL, as indicated in previous studies [30, 36–38]. Finally, the constructed models were imported to the FE software ABAQUS for further analysis.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The relative maximum von Mises and principal stresses were mainly found at the cervix of the PDL in the translation and inclination cases.The stress and displacement value rapidly decreased in the first few steps and then reached a plateau.Canine's movement type significantly influences the distribution of canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China. caiyongqing33@126.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study used the 3D finite element method to investigate canine's displacements and stresses in the canine's periodontal ligament (PDL) during canine's translation, inclination, and rotation with transparent tooth correction treatment.

Methods: Finite element models were developed to simulate dynamic orthodontic treatments of the translation, inclination, and rotation of the left mandibular canine with transparent tooth correction system. Piecewise static simulations were performed to replicate the dynamic process of orthodontic treatments. The distribution and change trends of canine's displacements and stresses in the canine's PDL during the three types of tooth movements were obtained.

Results: Maximum displacements were observed at the crown and middle part in the translation case, at the crown in the inclination case, and at the crown and root part in the rotation case. The relative maximum von Mises and principal stresses were mainly found at the cervix of the PDL in the translation and inclination cases. In the translation case, tensile stress was mainly observed on the mesial and distal surfaces near the lingual side and compressive stress was located at the bottom of the labial surface. In the inclination case, tensile stress was mainly observed at the labial cervix and lingual apex and compressive stress was located at the lingual cervix and labial apex. In the rotation case, von Mises stress was mainly located at the cervix and inside the lingual surface, tensile stress was located on the distal surface, and compressive stress was detected on the mesial surface. The stress and displacement value rapidly decreased in the first few steps and then reached a plateau.

Conclusions: Canine's movement type significantly influences the distribution of canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL. Changes in canine's displacement and stresses in the canine's PDL were exponential in transparent tooth correction treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus