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Clinical characteristics of protracted bacterial bronchitis in Chinese infants.

Wang Y, Hao C, Chi F, Yu X, Sun H, Huang L, Wang M, Ji W, Yan Y, Zhu H, Shao X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The clinical manifestations of PBB with airway malacia did not differ from those without malacia.Furthermore, CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were significantly lower in the PBB group (p < 0.01), while CD19(+), CD16(+)CD56(+) and CD23(+) cells were elevated (p < 0.01) in the PBB group.Airway malacia frequently co-existed with PBB, but did not exacerbate the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Affiliated Children's Hospital, Soochow University, Jingde Road No. 303, Suzhou 215003, China.

ABSTRACT
Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) is the common cause of chronic cough in children worldwide, but its etiology has not been fully recognized in China. We retrospectively investigated a total of 66 hospitalized infants under the age of three years with chronic wet cough enrolled in the Affiliated Children's Hospital of Soochow University from October 2010 to March 2014. All patients underwent bronchoscopy and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) samples were processed for microbiological and cytological analysis. Of 66 patients with wet cough, 50 (75.8%) were diagnosed with PBB. In the PBB group, wet cough was accompanied by wheezing (90%). Airway malacia were identified in 22 cases (44%). The clinical manifestations of PBB with airway malacia did not differ from those without malacia. Haemophilus influenzae (47.4%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (36.8%) were the most commonly identified pathogens. Furthermore, CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were significantly lower in the PBB group (p < 0.01), while CD19(+), CD16(+)CD56(+) and CD23(+) cells were elevated (p < 0.01) in the PBB group. Our study revealed PBB is an important cause of chronic wet cough in Chinese infants, and that changes of lymphocyte subsets are observed in children with PBB. Airway malacia frequently co-existed with PBB, but did not exacerbate the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bronchoscopic findings of a patient with PBB.Redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes accompanied by bronchomalacia are seen under bronchoscopy.
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f1: Bronchoscopic findings of a patient with PBB.Redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes accompanied by bronchomalacia are seen under bronchoscopy.

Mentions: Bronchoscopy of the 50 patients with PBB revealed redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes as the main characteristic. Thirty-three cases (66%) had thin secretions, eight cases (16%) had sticky secretions, six cases (12%) had funicular secretions, and three cases (6%) had phlegm blots. Airway deformities were identified in 22 cases (44%), including: seven laryngomalacia (31.8%), three tracheomalacia (13.6%), nine bronchomalacia (40.9%), two laryngo- and bronchomalacia (9.1%), and one tracheobronchomalacia (4.5%) (Fig. 1).


Clinical characteristics of protracted bacterial bronchitis in Chinese infants.

Wang Y, Hao C, Chi F, Yu X, Sun H, Huang L, Wang M, Ji W, Yan Y, Zhu H, Shao X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bronchoscopic findings of a patient with PBB.Redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes accompanied by bronchomalacia are seen under bronchoscopy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559899&req=5

f1: Bronchoscopic findings of a patient with PBB.Redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes accompanied by bronchomalacia are seen under bronchoscopy.
Mentions: Bronchoscopy of the 50 patients with PBB revealed redness and edema of the bronchial mucous membranes as the main characteristic. Thirty-three cases (66%) had thin secretions, eight cases (16%) had sticky secretions, six cases (12%) had funicular secretions, and three cases (6%) had phlegm blots. Airway deformities were identified in 22 cases (44%), including: seven laryngomalacia (31.8%), three tracheomalacia (13.6%), nine bronchomalacia (40.9%), two laryngo- and bronchomalacia (9.1%), and one tracheobronchomalacia (4.5%) (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The clinical manifestations of PBB with airway malacia did not differ from those without malacia.Furthermore, CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were significantly lower in the PBB group (p < 0.01), while CD19(+), CD16(+)CD56(+) and CD23(+) cells were elevated (p < 0.01) in the PBB group.Airway malacia frequently co-existed with PBB, but did not exacerbate the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Affiliated Children's Hospital, Soochow University, Jingde Road No. 303, Suzhou 215003, China.

ABSTRACT
Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) is the common cause of chronic cough in children worldwide, but its etiology has not been fully recognized in China. We retrospectively investigated a total of 66 hospitalized infants under the age of three years with chronic wet cough enrolled in the Affiliated Children's Hospital of Soochow University from October 2010 to March 2014. All patients underwent bronchoscopy and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) samples were processed for microbiological and cytological analysis. Of 66 patients with wet cough, 50 (75.8%) were diagnosed with PBB. In the PBB group, wet cough was accompanied by wheezing (90%). Airway malacia were identified in 22 cases (44%). The clinical manifestations of PBB with airway malacia did not differ from those without malacia. Haemophilus influenzae (47.4%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (36.8%) were the most commonly identified pathogens. Furthermore, CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were significantly lower in the PBB group (p < 0.01), while CD19(+), CD16(+)CD56(+) and CD23(+) cells were elevated (p < 0.01) in the PBB group. Our study revealed PBB is an important cause of chronic wet cough in Chinese infants, and that changes of lymphocyte subsets are observed in children with PBB. Airway malacia frequently co-existed with PBB, but did not exacerbate the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus