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Interface-Free Area-Scalable Self-Powered Electroluminescent System Driven by Triboelectric Generator.

Wei XY, Kuang SY, Li HY, Pan C, Zhu G, Wang ZL - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Self-powered system that is interface-free is greatly desired for area-scalable application.The TEG provides high-voltage alternating electric output, which fits in well with the needs of the TFEL lamp.It is demonstrated that multiple types of TEGs are applicable to the self-powered system, indicating that the system can make use of diverse mechanical sources and thus has potentially broad applications in illumination, display, entertainment, indication, surveillance and many others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083, China.

ABSTRACT
Self-powered system that is interface-free is greatly desired for area-scalable application. Here we report a self-powered electroluminescent system that consists of a triboelectric generator (TEG) and a thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) lamp. The TEG provides high-voltage alternating electric output, which fits in well with the needs of the TFEL lamp. Induced charges pumped onto the lamp by the TEG generate an electric field that is sufficient to excite luminescence without an electrical interface circuit. Through rational serial connection of multiple TFEL lamps, effective and area-scalable luminescence is realized. It is demonstrated that multiple types of TEGs are applicable to the self-powered system, indicating that the system can make use of diverse mechanical sources and thus has potentially broad applications in illumination, display, entertainment, indication, surveillance and many others.

No MeSH data available.


Electrical measurement results on a single ACTFEL lamp when an array of three lamps is used with different connection methods.(a) Voltage applied onto a lamp that is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Current (b) and induced charges (c) that flow through a lamp when it is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Note: lamps are driven by the rotary TEG at a rotation rate of 500 r/min.
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f4: Electrical measurement results on a single ACTFEL lamp when an array of three lamps is used with different connection methods.(a) Voltage applied onto a lamp that is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Current (b) and induced charges (c) that flow through a lamp when it is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Note: lamps are driven by the rotary TEG at a rotation rate of 500 r/min.

Mentions: The above contradiction is attributed to different electrical characteristics of the connection methods. To illustrate this point, electrical measurement was performed on three ACTFEL lamps of the same size (3 cm by 3 cm) that were driven by a rotary TEG. The voltage applied onto each lamp for the serial connection is approximately three times of that for the parallel connection (Fig. 4a). The same result also applies to the cases of current (Fig. 4b) and induced charges (Fig. 4c). The detailed experimental values of the electrical measurement are tabulated in Supporting Table S1. Therefore, the serial connection provides a viable route in obtaining an area-scalable self-powered electroluminescent system. As demonstrated in Fig. 5, a contact TEG of 12 cm by 15 cm was directly connected to six ACTFEL lamps (3 cm by 5 cm) that were in serial connection. When triggered by footsteps, all of the lamps were excited simultaneously, which was clearly visible even in ambient light (Fig. 5 and Supporting Movie S2). The overall luminescent area reaches approximately 90 cm2. The demonstration reveals potentially wide applications of the self-powered system in areas such as illumination, display, indication, monitoring and surveillance.


Interface-Free Area-Scalable Self-Powered Electroluminescent System Driven by Triboelectric Generator.

Wei XY, Kuang SY, Li HY, Pan C, Zhu G, Wang ZL - Sci Rep (2015)

Electrical measurement results on a single ACTFEL lamp when an array of three lamps is used with different connection methods.(a) Voltage applied onto a lamp that is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Current (b) and induced charges (c) that flow through a lamp when it is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Note: lamps are driven by the rotary TEG at a rotation rate of 500 r/min.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559893&req=5

f4: Electrical measurement results on a single ACTFEL lamp when an array of three lamps is used with different connection methods.(a) Voltage applied onto a lamp that is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Current (b) and induced charges (c) that flow through a lamp when it is in parallel (left column) and in serial (right column) connection with others. Note: lamps are driven by the rotary TEG at a rotation rate of 500 r/min.
Mentions: The above contradiction is attributed to different electrical characteristics of the connection methods. To illustrate this point, electrical measurement was performed on three ACTFEL lamps of the same size (3 cm by 3 cm) that were driven by a rotary TEG. The voltage applied onto each lamp for the serial connection is approximately three times of that for the parallel connection (Fig. 4a). The same result also applies to the cases of current (Fig. 4b) and induced charges (Fig. 4c). The detailed experimental values of the electrical measurement are tabulated in Supporting Table S1. Therefore, the serial connection provides a viable route in obtaining an area-scalable self-powered electroluminescent system. As demonstrated in Fig. 5, a contact TEG of 12 cm by 15 cm was directly connected to six ACTFEL lamps (3 cm by 5 cm) that were in serial connection. When triggered by footsteps, all of the lamps were excited simultaneously, which was clearly visible even in ambient light (Fig. 5 and Supporting Movie S2). The overall luminescent area reaches approximately 90 cm2. The demonstration reveals potentially wide applications of the self-powered system in areas such as illumination, display, indication, monitoring and surveillance.

Bottom Line: Self-powered system that is interface-free is greatly desired for area-scalable application.The TEG provides high-voltage alternating electric output, which fits in well with the needs of the TFEL lamp.It is demonstrated that multiple types of TEGs are applicable to the self-powered system, indicating that the system can make use of diverse mechanical sources and thus has potentially broad applications in illumination, display, entertainment, indication, surveillance and many others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083, China.

ABSTRACT
Self-powered system that is interface-free is greatly desired for area-scalable application. Here we report a self-powered electroluminescent system that consists of a triboelectric generator (TEG) and a thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) lamp. The TEG provides high-voltage alternating electric output, which fits in well with the needs of the TFEL lamp. Induced charges pumped onto the lamp by the TEG generate an electric field that is sufficient to excite luminescence without an electrical interface circuit. Through rational serial connection of multiple TFEL lamps, effective and area-scalable luminescence is realized. It is demonstrated that multiple types of TEGs are applicable to the self-powered system, indicating that the system can make use of diverse mechanical sources and thus has potentially broad applications in illumination, display, entertainment, indication, surveillance and many others.

No MeSH data available.