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Patient-reported sexual toxicity after radiation therapy in long-term prostate cancer survivors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: To present an overview of patient-reported sexual toxicity in sexually active long-term prostate cancer survivors treated with radiation therapy.

Methods:: We used patient-reported outcomes from a study-specific questionnaire surveying symptoms after prostate cancer radiation therapy. Data from 518 men treated at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were analysed. The men had undergone primary or salvage external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy (BT). We also used information from 155 non-treated reference men from the general population with no history of prostate cancer, matched for age and residency.

Results:: Median time from treatment to follow-up was 5 years (range: 1–14 years). Among the 16 investigated symptoms on erectile function, libido, orgasm, and seminal fluid, 9 symptoms in the primary EBRT group and 10 in both the salvage EBRT and the EBRT+BT groups were statistically significantly more prevalent in survivors than in reference men. Erectile dysfunction was influenced by both age and time to follow-up, whereas symptoms relating to orgasm and seminal fluid were influenced by time to follow-up only. Not being sexually active was almost one and a half times as common in survivors as in reference men.

Conclusions:: The presented symptom profiles can help to develop personalized therapy for prostate cancer through a better understanding of which radiation-induced toxicities to be addressed in the clinic and can also assist in identifying suitable interventions for existing symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of time since radiation therapy on symptom prevalence for prostate cancer survivors displayed by radiation therapy regimen. Time to follow-up in intervals shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7.5 years and longer than 7.5 years displayed on the x axis and symptom prevalence on the y axis. Primary external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) displayed in the dark grey bars, EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (EBRT+BT) displayed in the light grey bars, and salvage EBRT displayed in the white bars; the dotted line is the prevalence in reference men. The numbers preceding each symptom refer to the associated question number in Table 2.
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fig2: The effect of time since radiation therapy on symptom prevalence for prostate cancer survivors displayed by radiation therapy regimen. Time to follow-up in intervals shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7.5 years and longer than 7.5 years displayed on the x axis and symptom prevalence on the y axis. Primary external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) displayed in the dark grey bars, EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (EBRT+BT) displayed in the light grey bars, and salvage EBRT displayed in the white bars; the dotted line is the prevalence in reference men. The numbers preceding each symptom refer to the associated question number in Table 2.

Mentions: The influence of time to follow-up by treatment on the symptoms with statistically significant prevalence ratios between survivors and reference men is shown in Supplementary Figure 2. When dividing each survivor group into time to follow-up intervals of shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7 years, and longer than 7.5 years, there were four symptoms where the symptom prevalence varied with time to follow-up within a treatment group (Figure 2). Two symptoms related to erectile dysfunction (questions 1 and 5), one to orgasm (question 12), and one to seminal fluid (question 10).


Patient-reported sexual toxicity after radiation therapy in long-term prostate cancer survivors
The effect of time since radiation therapy on symptom prevalence for prostate cancer survivors displayed by radiation therapy regimen. Time to follow-up in intervals shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7.5 years and longer than 7.5 years displayed on the x axis and symptom prevalence on the y axis. Primary external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) displayed in the dark grey bars, EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (EBRT+BT) displayed in the light grey bars, and salvage EBRT displayed in the white bars; the dotted line is the prevalence in reference men. The numbers preceding each symptom refer to the associated question number in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559833&req=5

fig2: The effect of time since radiation therapy on symptom prevalence for prostate cancer survivors displayed by radiation therapy regimen. Time to follow-up in intervals shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7.5 years and longer than 7.5 years displayed on the x axis and symptom prevalence on the y axis. Primary external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) displayed in the dark grey bars, EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (EBRT+BT) displayed in the light grey bars, and salvage EBRT displayed in the white bars; the dotted line is the prevalence in reference men. The numbers preceding each symptom refer to the associated question number in Table 2.
Mentions: The influence of time to follow-up by treatment on the symptoms with statistically significant prevalence ratios between survivors and reference men is shown in Supplementary Figure 2. When dividing each survivor group into time to follow-up intervals of shorter than 3 years, 3–5 years, 5–7 years, and longer than 7.5 years, there were four symptoms where the symptom prevalence varied with time to follow-up within a treatment group (Figure 2). Two symptoms related to erectile dysfunction (questions 1 and 5), one to orgasm (question 12), and one to seminal fluid (question 10).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: To present an overview of patient-reported sexual toxicity in sexually active long-term prostate cancer survivors treated with radiation therapy.

Methods:: We used patient-reported outcomes from a study-specific questionnaire surveying symptoms after prostate cancer radiation therapy. Data from 518 men treated at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were analysed. The men had undergone primary or salvage external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy (BT). We also used information from 155 non-treated reference men from the general population with no history of prostate cancer, matched for age and residency.

Results:: Median time from treatment to follow-up was 5 years (range: 1–14 years). Among the 16 investigated symptoms on erectile function, libido, orgasm, and seminal fluid, 9 symptoms in the primary EBRT group and 10 in both the salvage EBRT and the EBRT+BT groups were statistically significantly more prevalent in survivors than in reference men. Erectile dysfunction was influenced by both age and time to follow-up, whereas symptoms relating to orgasm and seminal fluid were influenced by time to follow-up only. Not being sexually active was almost one and a half times as common in survivors as in reference men.

Conclusions:: The presented symptom profiles can help to develop personalized therapy for prostate cancer through a better understanding of which radiation-induced toxicities to be addressed in the clinic and can also assist in identifying suitable interventions for existing symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus