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Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

Walters S, Benitez-Majano S, Muller P, Coleman MP, Allemani C, Butler J, Peake M, Guren MG, Glimelius B, Bergström S, Påhlman L, Rachet B - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden.There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012.Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is 'closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries.

Methods: Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995-2012. Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends.

Results: Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005-2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009.

Conclusions: Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Data sources and periods of diagnosis. The data in our study originated either from the CONCORD-2 study or from the Office for National Statistics. Patients from England were grouped based on their date of diagnosis both by calendar periods of the CONCORD-2 study (for comparability with the other countries) and by year (to allow analysis of yearly changes).
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fig1: Data sources and periods of diagnosis. The data in our study originated either from the CONCORD-2 study or from the Office for National Statistics. Patients from England were grouped based on their date of diagnosis both by calendar periods of the CONCORD-2 study (for comparability with the other countries) and by year (to allow analysis of yearly changes).

Mentions: Methods and tools used in the CONCORD-2 study were applied to the more up-to-date National Cancer Registry data for England in order to compare cancer survival in all six countries for the calendar periods of diagnosis 1995–1999, 2000–2004 and 2005–2009. Survival was also estimated for patients diagnosed during 2010–2012 in England, as well as year-on-year trends for 1995–2012, with follow-up to 2013 (Figure 1).


Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

Walters S, Benitez-Majano S, Muller P, Coleman MP, Allemani C, Butler J, Peake M, Guren MG, Glimelius B, Bergström S, Påhlman L, Rachet B - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Data sources and periods of diagnosis. The data in our study originated either from the CONCORD-2 study or from the Office for National Statistics. Patients from England were grouped based on their date of diagnosis both by calendar periods of the CONCORD-2 study (for comparability with the other countries) and by year (to allow analysis of yearly changes).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559829&req=5

fig1: Data sources and periods of diagnosis. The data in our study originated either from the CONCORD-2 study or from the Office for National Statistics. Patients from England were grouped based on their date of diagnosis both by calendar periods of the CONCORD-2 study (for comparability with the other countries) and by year (to allow analysis of yearly changes).
Mentions: Methods and tools used in the CONCORD-2 study were applied to the more up-to-date National Cancer Registry data for England in order to compare cancer survival in all six countries for the calendar periods of diagnosis 1995–1999, 2000–2004 and 2005–2009. Survival was also estimated for patients diagnosed during 2010–2012 in England, as well as year-on-year trends for 1995–2012, with follow-up to 2013 (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden.There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012.Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is 'closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries.

Methods: Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995-2012. Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends.

Results: Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005-2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009.

Conclusions: Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus